Presentation Title

The Antimutagenic Effects of Arceuthobium Americanum

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Extracts from European mistletoe (Viscum album) have been used in alternative cancer treatments for nearly a century, as the extracts have modest antimutagenic properties. The dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) and V. album are from the same family and share similar characteristics. Both are plant-plant parasites, taking water and minerals from their hosts. However, it remains unknown as to whether or not A.americanum extracts are also antimutagenic. The objective of this research is to determine if extracts of A.americanum have antimutagenic properties when tested against some standard mutagens. Methanol extraction of A.americanum’s fruits and stem will be conducted, and the extracts and tested with histidine-dependent Salmonella typhimurium strains via the Ames test, a standard method of detecting mutagenicity/antimutagenicity. The S.typhimurium strains tested contain different mutations in assorted genes in the histidine operon and are more easily back mutated than others in the presence of mutagens. When more Salmonella cells grow – the more reversions back to his+. The same test could be conducted with modifications to test for antimutagenic activity. This research could reveal that A.americanum has antimutagenic properties similar to V. album. This result would be a first for the Arceuthobium genus. Furthermore, finding antimutagenicity in A.americanum would open an entirely new avenue for potential cancer therapy.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Joanna Urban

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The Antimutagenic Effects of Arceuthobium Americanum

Extracts from European mistletoe (Viscum album) have been used in alternative cancer treatments for nearly a century, as the extracts have modest antimutagenic properties. The dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum) and V. album are from the same family and share similar characteristics. Both are plant-plant parasites, taking water and minerals from their hosts. However, it remains unknown as to whether or not A.americanum extracts are also antimutagenic. The objective of this research is to determine if extracts of A.americanum have antimutagenic properties when tested against some standard mutagens. Methanol extraction of A.americanum’s fruits and stem will be conducted, and the extracts and tested with histidine-dependent Salmonella typhimurium strains via the Ames test, a standard method of detecting mutagenicity/antimutagenicity. The S.typhimurium strains tested contain different mutations in assorted genes in the histidine operon and are more easily back mutated than others in the presence of mutagens. When more Salmonella cells grow – the more reversions back to his+. The same test could be conducted with modifications to test for antimutagenic activity. This research could reveal that A.americanum has antimutagenic properties similar to V. album. This result would be a first for the Arceuthobium genus. Furthermore, finding antimutagenicity in A.americanum would open an entirely new avenue for potential cancer therapy.