Presentation Title

An Inventory of Spectral Features in C60-rich Planetary Nebulae

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Four planetary nebula are being analysed (two from the Milky Way galaxy, one from the Small Magellanic Cloud and one from the Large Magellanic Cloud) using the CASSIS and IDL software. The data from the nebulae was collected using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) which is one of the instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope and data is available through the Combined Atlas of Sources with Spitzer IRS Spectra (CASSIS) database. The CASSIS computer software is being used to fit Gaussians to the different peaks, calculate total flux, and produce visual graphics of the numerical data. The IDL software is being used to calculate line strengths and UV excitations. In order to determine weak signals from the artifacts, the two different reduction methods are compared. Once the signals have been characterized the objects are organised in the order of UV excitation. This allows for the study of the formation and reaction mechanisms of fullerenes and other compounds.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Heidi Huttunen-Hennelly and Joanne Rosvick

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An Inventory of Spectral Features in C60-rich Planetary Nebulae

Four planetary nebula are being analysed (two from the Milky Way galaxy, one from the Small Magellanic Cloud and one from the Large Magellanic Cloud) using the CASSIS and IDL software. The data from the nebulae was collected using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) which is one of the instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope and data is available through the Combined Atlas of Sources with Spitzer IRS Spectra (CASSIS) database. The CASSIS computer software is being used to fit Gaussians to the different peaks, calculate total flux, and produce visual graphics of the numerical data. The IDL software is being used to calculate line strengths and UV excitations. In order to determine weak signals from the artifacts, the two different reduction methods are compared. Once the signals have been characterized the objects are organised in the order of UV excitation. This allows for the study of the formation and reaction mechanisms of fullerenes and other compounds.