Presentation Title

High Image Intensity and Other Factors Increasing Choice of Reappraisal Over Distraction

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Some emotion regulation strategies may favour emotional coping in the short-term, while others are more effective in the long-term. The intensity of emotional events and the goals of emotion regulation efforts influence strategy choice. Long-term regulatory goals or low intensity negative stimuli increase the choice of strategies with long-term effects, such as reappraisal, whereas short-term regulatory goals or high intensity images increase the choice of strategies with short-term effects, such as distraction (Sheppes et al., 2014). Additionally, factors such as Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) related to long term consideration may predict regulatory choices (Ortner, Chadwick, & Wilson, 2018).

We will conduct a replication of Sheppes et al.’s Study 3 (2014). Participants completed a measure of trait CFC before receiving training in reappraisal and distraction. They were randomly assigned to focus on either an immediate goal (choose the strategy to make you feel less negative) or a long-term goal (you will encounter all the stimuli again while watching them naturally) to regulate their emotions. Participants viewed 30 high and low arousal negative stimuli and chose between reappraisal and distraction on each trial. They then implemented their chosen strategy for 5 s before rating their negative feelings.

We expect that participants will be more likely to choose reappraisal over distraction for high than low intensity images. Participants given a long-term goal and those with higher CFC scores are expected to show an increased preference for reappraisal over distraction than those given a short-term goal or with lower CFC scores.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Catherine Ortner

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High Image Intensity and Other Factors Increasing Choice of Reappraisal Over Distraction

Some emotion regulation strategies may favour emotional coping in the short-term, while others are more effective in the long-term. The intensity of emotional events and the goals of emotion regulation efforts influence strategy choice. Long-term regulatory goals or low intensity negative stimuli increase the choice of strategies with long-term effects, such as reappraisal, whereas short-term regulatory goals or high intensity images increase the choice of strategies with short-term effects, such as distraction (Sheppes et al., 2014). Additionally, factors such as Consideration of Future Consequences (CFC) related to long term consideration may predict regulatory choices (Ortner, Chadwick, & Wilson, 2018).

We will conduct a replication of Sheppes et al.’s Study 3 (2014). Participants completed a measure of trait CFC before receiving training in reappraisal and distraction. They were randomly assigned to focus on either an immediate goal (choose the strategy to make you feel less negative) or a long-term goal (you will encounter all the stimuli again while watching them naturally) to regulate their emotions. Participants viewed 30 high and low arousal negative stimuli and chose between reappraisal and distraction on each trial. They then implemented their chosen strategy for 5 s before rating their negative feelings.

We expect that participants will be more likely to choose reappraisal over distraction for high than low intensity images. Participants given a long-term goal and those with higher CFC scores are expected to show an increased preference for reappraisal over distraction than those given a short-term goal or with lower CFC scores.