Presentation Title

Quantification of Cation Adulterants in Commercial Choline Chloride Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

During oil field drilling, clay-containing formations will often swell, creating a number of problems during the extraction process. These problems lead to inefficiencies which increase both the cost and time required for the oil extraction process. In order to prevent clay formations from swelling, commercial clay stabilizers are most often used. Choline chloride is seeing an increase in use over other clay stabilizers as it is believed to have a lower environmental impact. Unfortunately, adulterants have been detected in numerous commercial choline chloride products. These adulterants are often calcium, potassium, sodium, and ammonium based chloride salts. Concerns over both the environmental impacts of these adulterants leeching into groundwater and integrity of the companies producing these products has, as a result, arisen. In response to these concerns, a precise method to accurately quantify the concentration of adulterants in these products is needed. In this work, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is being used to determine the concentrations of calcium, potassium, and sodium, which are potential adulterants in commercial choline chloride samples. Sodium chloride, potassium nitrate, and calcium carbonate will be used to develop a calibration curve from which the concentrations of adulterants in these commercial choline chloride products can then be determined.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Kingsley Donkor

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Quantification of Cation Adulterants in Commercial Choline Chloride Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

During oil field drilling, clay-containing formations will often swell, creating a number of problems during the extraction process. These problems lead to inefficiencies which increase both the cost and time required for the oil extraction process. In order to prevent clay formations from swelling, commercial clay stabilizers are most often used. Choline chloride is seeing an increase in use over other clay stabilizers as it is believed to have a lower environmental impact. Unfortunately, adulterants have been detected in numerous commercial choline chloride products. These adulterants are often calcium, potassium, sodium, and ammonium based chloride salts. Concerns over both the environmental impacts of these adulterants leeching into groundwater and integrity of the companies producing these products has, as a result, arisen. In response to these concerns, a precise method to accurately quantify the concentration of adulterants in these products is needed. In this work, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) is being used to determine the concentrations of calcium, potassium, and sodium, which are potential adulterants in commercial choline chloride samples. Sodium chloride, potassium nitrate, and calcium carbonate will be used to develop a calibration curve from which the concentrations of adulterants in these commercial choline chloride products can then be determined.