Presentation Title

A Comparison of Song Structure in Island Songbirds and That of Their Mainland Relatives

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

The goal of this project was to examine bird song evolution on oceanic islands. To do so, I collected and analyzed the structure of songs. Over the course of this project, species lists were created for 3 families, Meliphagidae, Estrildidae, and Fringillidae, which occupy both mainland continents and islands. For each species, I collected song recordings (if recordings were available) using both Xeno-canto and the Macaulay Library. Songs were prepared and analyzed using the programs Audacity and Avi-soft. For the analysis, I chose 6 variables to measure: the number of distinct variables within the song, length of song, the number of syllables per second (Syllable rate), the maximum and minimum frequencies of the song and the total bandwidth of the song. An analysis, following phylogenetic controls and independent contrasts will be conducted to inspect for consistent divergent patterns in song structure across island species.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Matt Reudink

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A Comparison of Song Structure in Island Songbirds and That of Their Mainland Relatives

The goal of this project was to examine bird song evolution on oceanic islands. To do so, I collected and analyzed the structure of songs. Over the course of this project, species lists were created for 3 families, Meliphagidae, Estrildidae, and Fringillidae, which occupy both mainland continents and islands. For each species, I collected song recordings (if recordings were available) using both Xeno-canto and the Macaulay Library. Songs were prepared and analyzed using the programs Audacity and Avi-soft. For the analysis, I chose 6 variables to measure: the number of distinct variables within the song, length of song, the number of syllables per second (Syllable rate), the maximum and minimum frequencies of the song and the total bandwidth of the song. An analysis, following phylogenetic controls and independent contrasts will be conducted to inspect for consistent divergent patterns in song structure across island species.