Presentation Title

Making Bacteria Work for Us: Precision Medicine and the Human Microbiome

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

Personalized medicine has been revolutionizing medical practices since 2011. Physicians are transitioning from a black-box, disease-based model to an individualized practice. This practice utilizes emergent technologies, enabling physicians to provide more individualized care by taking a patient’s genome, environment, and lifestyle into their diagnostic and treatment options.

The driving force behind this transition in medical practice is technology advancement. Physicians can now look at many factors of a patient’s life, turning every detail into a number and performing mass analysis on the data. This is also referred to as -omics technologies, which can be combined to form correlations between lifestyle and illness in an individual.

Human cells are far outnumbered by microbial organisms that live on and within us. These organisms often help us by providing important nutrients and vitamins as well as keeping other, undesirable pathogens from growing uncontrollably. Analyzing the human microbiome has a host of challenges for researchers, the most significant of which is that many of the species simply will not grow in the lab. While much of the research up to now has been correlational, the microbiome has recently been shown to be determinant of treatment success in immunotherapies. The microbiome is also implicated in systems such as our immune response, intestinal health, obesity, and cancer.

The presentation will discuss how -omics can be used to characterize the microbiome and inform how it can be manipulated and monitored to improve human health.

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Advisor

Don Nelson

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Making Bacteria Work for Us: Precision Medicine and the Human Microbiome

Personalized medicine has been revolutionizing medical practices since 2011. Physicians are transitioning from a black-box, disease-based model to an individualized practice. This practice utilizes emergent technologies, enabling physicians to provide more individualized care by taking a patient’s genome, environment, and lifestyle into their diagnostic and treatment options.

The driving force behind this transition in medical practice is technology advancement. Physicians can now look at many factors of a patient’s life, turning every detail into a number and performing mass analysis on the data. This is also referred to as -omics technologies, which can be combined to form correlations between lifestyle and illness in an individual.

Human cells are far outnumbered by microbial organisms that live on and within us. These organisms often help us by providing important nutrients and vitamins as well as keeping other, undesirable pathogens from growing uncontrollably. Analyzing the human microbiome has a host of challenges for researchers, the most significant of which is that many of the species simply will not grow in the lab. While much of the research up to now has been correlational, the microbiome has recently been shown to be determinant of treatment success in immunotherapies. The microbiome is also implicated in systems such as our immune response, intestinal health, obesity, and cancer.

The presentation will discuss how -omics can be used to characterize the microbiome and inform how it can be manipulated and monitored to improve human health.