Presentation Title

Optimizing the Production of Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave-Dwelling Streptomyces S1 Strain

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented the Friday of the conference

Abstract

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has greatly hindered today’s antimicrobial agents that were once revolutionary developments. No longer a battle mankind can win with commercially available pharmaceutical antibiotics, the microbial products from various organisms are being extensively studied for potentially better and more effective antimicrobial properties to be used as an alternative. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by the cave-dwelling Streptomyces S1 strain which exhibit these desired antimicrobial properties against strains of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

The Streptomyces S1 strain was grown at a temperature of 15°C in both agar and broth cultures of R2A, Hickey Tresnar, and nutrient media. In an attempt to optimize their growth conditions and their production of secondary metabolites, the strain was subjected to ten different fermentation broths. Producing a characteristic brown pigment in only 72 hours with a considerable growth rate, the cave dwellers seemed to favour a simple nutrient broth media. Testing against both laboratory and drug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, bioactivity was analysed on a regular schedule through agar-plug assay, agar-well assay, and/or Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion over a one month period. Antimicrobial activity was observed in as little as 24 hours against the target-organism bacterial lawns after incubating at 15°C or 37°C. Upon presence of bioactivity, protein extractions were performed and analysed through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

Department

Chemistry

Faculty Advisor

Heidi Huttunen-Hennelly

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Optimizing the Production of Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Cave-Dwelling Streptomyces S1 Strain

The progression of antibiotic resistant microorganisms has greatly hindered today’s antimicrobial agents that were once revolutionary developments. No longer a battle mankind can win with commercially available pharmaceutical antibiotics, the microbial products from various organisms are being extensively studied for potentially better and more effective antimicrobial properties to be used as an alternative. This study examines the secondary metabolites produced by the cave-dwelling Streptomyces S1 strain which exhibit these desired antimicrobial properties against strains of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

The Streptomyces S1 strain was grown at a temperature of 15°C in both agar and broth cultures of R2A, Hickey Tresnar, and nutrient media. In an attempt to optimize their growth conditions and their production of secondary metabolites, the strain was subjected to ten different fermentation broths. Producing a characteristic brown pigment in only 72 hours with a considerable growth rate, the cave dwellers seemed to favour a simple nutrient broth media. Testing against both laboratory and drug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, bioactivity was analysed on a regular schedule through agar-plug assay, agar-well assay, and/or Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion over a one month period. Antimicrobial activity was observed in as little as 24 hours against the target-organism bacterial lawns after incubating at 15°C or 37°C. Upon presence of bioactivity, protein extractions were performed and analysed through 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.