Presentation Type

Long asynchronous

Proposal Website

https://media.tru.ca/media/Kaltura+Capture+recording+-+February+12th+2021%2C+8A46A59+am/0_jhvfcg8c

Start Date

16-2-2021 5:00 PM

End Date

28-2-2021 12:00 AM

Proposal Abstract

Coming to the Fire: Tinder, Kindling, and Sparks We all come from different backgrounds~ in time immemorial, our nations regarded this as coming from different "fires" to denote not only the geographical location but also the nations' culture, language, traditions and practices. Thus, when we met as a class, to learn about Indigenous health through a virtual teaching and learning environment, we gathered, around a common fire. ‘Coming to a fire" is used as a metaphor to acknowledge each other and respect each of our backgrounds to learn, share and gather. My metaphor for teaching and learning often centers around being in the outdoors-the land, waters, trees, Indigenous culture, and the importance of campfires. Campfires are the root of sharing, learning, feasting, storytelling and ceremonies. Fire represents the heat generated through sharing in a circle that is supportive, and participants feel safe to explore and learn about topics to improve their understanding of their role in working in partnership with communities. Participants will learn about the lessons I learnt as a Gitxsan, associate teaching professor in the delivery of the course online and that the greatest learning, understanding and appreciation occurs through engaging with humility and the extending of invitations to others to come to the fire.

If the above link does not work, please use this link: https://admin.video.ubc.ca/html5/html5lib/v2.82.2/mwEmbedFrame.php/p/170/uiconf_id/23451101/entry_id/0_jhvfcg8c?wid=_170&iframeembed=true&playerId=kaltura_player&entry_id=0_jhvfcg8c&flashvars%5blocalizationCode%5d=en&flashvars%5bleadWithHTML5%5d=true&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.position%5d=left&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.clickToClose%5d=true&flashvars%5bchapters.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bchapters.layout%5d=vertical&flashvars%5bchapters.thumbnailRotator%5d=false&flashvars%5bstreamSelector.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bEmbedPlayer.SpinnerTarget%5d=videoHolder&flashvars%5bdualScreen.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bhotspots.plugin%5d=1&flashvars%5bKaltura.addCrossoriginToIframe%5d=true&&wid=0_pqwpvup7

Statement

I share the challenges and opportunities of teaching and learning without walls to create a safe space for students to learn about racism, decolonisation and their role in improving Indigenous health outcomes.

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COinS
 
Feb 16th, 5:00 PM Feb 28th, 12:00 AM

Asynchronous: Coming to the Fire: Tinder, Kindling and Sparks

Coming to the Fire: Tinder, Kindling, and Sparks We all come from different backgrounds~ in time immemorial, our nations regarded this as coming from different "fires" to denote not only the geographical location but also the nations' culture, language, traditions and practices. Thus, when we met as a class, to learn about Indigenous health through a virtual teaching and learning environment, we gathered, around a common fire. ‘Coming to a fire" is used as a metaphor to acknowledge each other and respect each of our backgrounds to learn, share and gather. My metaphor for teaching and learning often centers around being in the outdoors-the land, waters, trees, Indigenous culture, and the importance of campfires. Campfires are the root of sharing, learning, feasting, storytelling and ceremonies. Fire represents the heat generated through sharing in a circle that is supportive, and participants feel safe to explore and learn about topics to improve their understanding of their role in working in partnership with communities. Participants will learn about the lessons I learnt as a Gitxsan, associate teaching professor in the delivery of the course online and that the greatest learning, understanding and appreciation occurs through engaging with humility and the extending of invitations to others to come to the fire.

If the above link does not work, please use this link: https://admin.video.ubc.ca/html5/html5lib/v2.82.2/mwEmbedFrame.php/p/170/uiconf_id/23451101/entry_id/0_jhvfcg8c?wid=_170&iframeembed=true&playerId=kaltura_player&entry_id=0_jhvfcg8c&flashvars%5blocalizationCode%5d=en&flashvars%5bleadWithHTML5%5d=true&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.position%5d=left&flashvars%5bsideBarContainer.clickToClose%5d=true&flashvars%5bchapters.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bchapters.layout%5d=vertical&flashvars%5bchapters.thumbnailRotator%5d=false&flashvars%5bstreamSelector.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bEmbedPlayer.SpinnerTarget%5d=videoHolder&flashvars%5bdualScreen.plugin%5d=true&flashvars%5bhotspots.plugin%5d=1&flashvars%5bKaltura.addCrossoriginToIframe%5d=true&&wid=0_pqwpvup7

https://digitalcommons.library.tru.ca/tpc/2021/program/27

 

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