Proposal Title

Considering Culture When Building Online Learning Communities

Presenter Information

Robline C.E. DaveyFollow

Presentation Type

Short (15 minute) synchronous

Start Date

16-2-2021 2:50 PM

End Date

16-2-2021 3:10 PM

Proposal Abstract

“[I]t is not technologies, but educational purposes and pedagogy, that must provide the lead, with students understanding not only how to work with ICTs, but why it is of benefit for them to do so” (Kirkwood & Price, 2005, p. 257). Especially in the current context of a worldwide pandemic, when all post-secondary instruction has moved online, critical to success is the ability for students to develop competencies to navigate online spaces and understand how to participate in and develop identities in online learning communities. Recommendations for the effective use of online learning recognize that instructors must deliberately structure interaction patterns to overcome the potential lack of social presence online, but also that students have the opportunity to participate in online discourse equally or equitably. This short presentation outlines some of the arguments and recommendations in current scholarship for using a critical lens, and one specific to Indigenous worldviews, to design online learning communities that are inclusive of diverse learners, make space for multiple epistemologies and cultural contexts, and foster agency and equity within online discourse. I will detail some of the challenges that students from non-dominant cultural contexts face and then describe how various theories for knowledge construction can be relevant for Indigenous learners.

Statement

My short presentation aligns with the conference theme: Beyond Words: Indigenization & Virtual Classrooms by discussing relevant concerns with building equity and inclusion into online discourse, a major factor in building online community. It also touches on a secondary theme of Beyond Exclusion: Anti-racism, Inclusivity, 2SLGBTQIA+ by referencing bias and directly addressing inclusion.

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Feb 16th, 2:50 PM Feb 16th, 3:10 PM

Considering Culture When Building Online Learning Communities

“[I]t is not technologies, but educational purposes and pedagogy, that must provide the lead, with students understanding not only how to work with ICTs, but why it is of benefit for them to do so” (Kirkwood & Price, 2005, p. 257). Especially in the current context of a worldwide pandemic, when all post-secondary instruction has moved online, critical to success is the ability for students to develop competencies to navigate online spaces and understand how to participate in and develop identities in online learning communities. Recommendations for the effective use of online learning recognize that instructors must deliberately structure interaction patterns to overcome the potential lack of social presence online, but also that students have the opportunity to participate in online discourse equally or equitably. This short presentation outlines some of the arguments and recommendations in current scholarship for using a critical lens, and one specific to Indigenous worldviews, to design online learning communities that are inclusive of diverse learners, make space for multiple epistemologies and cultural contexts, and foster agency and equity within online discourse. I will detail some of the challenges that students from non-dominant cultural contexts face and then describe how various theories for knowledge construction can be relevant for Indigenous learners.