Presentation Type

Long (40 minute) synchronous

Start Date

16-2-2021 11:40 AM

End Date

16-2-2021 12:20 PM

Proposal Abstract

Q: What do an ESTR Instructor, a Reference Librarian, a Coordinator of Educational Technologies and Innovation, and a Coordinator of Learning and Faculty Development have in common? A: A deep commitment to student learning! Due to COVID-19, ESTR students were unable to do in-community practica: instead, they engaged in transferable skill development in their safety bubbles. To broaden and enrich these experiences, small groups of students and their instructor had regular, structured consultations with a Reference Librarian. These sessions were, like all of the other content from the course, delivered virtually. While the technology and design of the course were ultimately the responsibility of the instructor, the development of both were supported and facilitated by the faculty development opportunities and one-on-one support offered by an Educational Technology Coordinator and a Coordinator from TRU’s Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT). Through the Facilitating Learning in Moodle course offered last summer, the Coordinator from CELT shared the Community of Inquiry Framework, which became the model for the ESTR Instructor’s course development. As well, the Educational Technology Coordinator provided training on the use of the WordPress platform, as well as other systems and tools—notably Moodle and H5P. Therefore, while the ESTR Instructor worked to build community with and for her learners, an informal faculty learning community was simultaneously forming around her and her course. In this session, we will share how our individual contributions built a whole that was greater than the sum of its parts. During the pandemic, faculty with various roles have done their part to ensure that students still have the best possible learning experience, and in the process we have discovered elements of virtual instruction that can be used to broaden and enrich educational experiences long after COVID-19. Finally, we have re-discovered how our roles are interconnected as we all work towards the common goal of student success.

Statement

The pivot to online was initially overwhelming to the ESTR educator. However, with the support of her faculty colleagues she delivered a course that benefited her students in Fall 2020 and created course elements that she will carry forward when the pandemic is over.

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Feb 16th, 11:40 AM Feb 16th, 12:20 PM

It Takes a Village: Building Faculty Connections to Support Student Learning in the Education and Skills Training (ESTR) Program During COVID-19

Q: What do an ESTR Instructor, a Reference Librarian, a Coordinator of Educational Technologies and Innovation, and a Coordinator of Learning and Faculty Development have in common? A: A deep commitment to student learning! Due to COVID-19, ESTR students were unable to do in-community practica: instead, they engaged in transferable skill development in their safety bubbles. To broaden and enrich these experiences, small groups of students and their instructor had regular, structured consultations with a Reference Librarian. These sessions were, like all of the other content from the course, delivered virtually. While the technology and design of the course were ultimately the responsibility of the instructor, the development of both were supported and facilitated by the faculty development opportunities and one-on-one support offered by an Educational Technology Coordinator and a Coordinator from TRU’s Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT). Through the Facilitating Learning in Moodle course offered last summer, the Coordinator from CELT shared the Community of Inquiry Framework, which became the model for the ESTR Instructor’s course development. As well, the Educational Technology Coordinator provided training on the use of the WordPress platform, as well as other systems and tools—notably Moodle and H5P. Therefore, while the ESTR Instructor worked to build community with and for her learners, an informal faculty learning community was simultaneously forming around her and her course. In this session, we will share how our individual contributions built a whole that was greater than the sum of its parts. During the pandemic, faculty with various roles have done their part to ensure that students still have the best possible learning experience, and in the process we have discovered elements of virtual instruction that can be used to broaden and enrich educational experiences long after COVID-19. Finally, we have re-discovered how our roles are interconnected as we all work towards the common goal of student success.

 

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