Proposal Title

Reconciling Place

Presentation Type

Round Table Discussion

Location

OM 3741

Start Date

19-2-2019 10:35 AM

End Date

19-2-2019 11:15 AM

Proposal Abstract

What threads, if any, weave between place-based education and education’s need to address the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action? In a culturally diverse educational institution such as TRU, is there a path that educators of settler and Indigenous descent can walk together in order to reconcile place? The work of Truth and Reconciliation is not easy and risks such pitfalls as cultural taxation on Indigenous colleagues as well as unintended violation of traditional protocol. This roundtable presentation will describe how a group of TRU educators from diverse backgrounds and disciplines recognized that a potential first step in this journey was to build compassion for and understanding of each other. Given that the one thing we all knew how to do was read (perhaps unsurprising given our occupations), we decided to read, in a book club format, two documents simultaneously: Secwepemc People, Land and Laws by Marianne and Ron Ignace and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. Reading these two documents in this format not only allowed us to take the first steps towards building a community of practice around reconciling place, it also allowed us to share concrete details of how we might integrate a growing understanding of Secwepemc language, placenames and names of plants and animals into our individual teaching practices. Of course, if reading has provided us with a first direction on the path to reconciling place, we know that it cannot end with these two documents. Thus, the purpose of this roundtable presentation is twofold: (1) to highlight this reading adventure to date, including its opportunities and difficulties and (2) to use the collective wisdom of all participants to generate a more comprehensive list of material that could support communities reading for reconciliation.

Statement

The the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action require immediate work that will be challenging for all educators. Embarking on the path to understanding what will be required to reconcile place has proven to be a far greater adventure in reading that first imagined. This roundtable will help begin a discussion of what books might provide a few first collaborative steps on the road to reconciliation in education.

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Feb 19th, 10:35 AM Feb 19th, 11:15 AM

Reconciling Place

OM 3741

What threads, if any, weave between place-based education and education’s need to address the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action? In a culturally diverse educational institution such as TRU, is there a path that educators of settler and Indigenous descent can walk together in order to reconcile place? The work of Truth and Reconciliation is not easy and risks such pitfalls as cultural taxation on Indigenous colleagues as well as unintended violation of traditional protocol. This roundtable presentation will describe how a group of TRU educators from diverse backgrounds and disciplines recognized that a potential first step in this journey was to build compassion for and understanding of each other. Given that the one thing we all knew how to do was read (perhaps unsurprising given our occupations), we decided to read, in a book club format, two documents simultaneously: Secwepemc People, Land and Laws by Marianne and Ron Ignace and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. Reading these two documents in this format not only allowed us to take the first steps towards building a community of practice around reconciling place, it also allowed us to share concrete details of how we might integrate a growing understanding of Secwepemc language, placenames and names of plants and animals into our individual teaching practices. Of course, if reading has provided us with a first direction on the path to reconciling place, we know that it cannot end with these two documents. Thus, the purpose of this roundtable presentation is twofold: (1) to highlight this reading adventure to date, including its opportunities and difficulties and (2) to use the collective wisdom of all participants to generate a more comprehensive list of material that could support communities reading for reconciliation.