Proposal Title

How Dramatic! Implementing a Pan Discipline Protocol for Developing Critical Role Plays

Presentation Type

Regular Presentation

Alternative Presentation Type:

reg_presentation

Location

OM 3632

Start Date

19-2-2018 11:20 AM

End Date

19-2-2018 12:00 PM

Proposal Abstract

Role plays are not new activities. Many professional fields such as nursing (Jenkins & Turick-Gibson, 1999) use these techniques extensively. Language classrooms are also common places to find the implementation of role plays and simulations (Larocque, 1986; Piper, 1984). While role plays are enjoying a renewed legitimacy in student-centred classrooms, there is little evidence in the research of the significant effect these techniques can have in teaching and learning. The understanding of what constitutes a role play is broad; it can be as simple as students “pretending” to be customers in a restaurant or as complex as nursing students engaging in a mock cardiac arrest. These activities involve a degree of authentic communication, spontaneity, and lack of predictability; they “…reside in the middle ground between creative thought and real-world interaction” (Shapiro & Leopold, 2012, p.123). Shapiro and Leopold (2012) define critical role-play as requiring “students to embody voices and perspectives that may be quite different from their own” (p.123) and can therefore be cognitively challenging. In a critical role play, students may be asked to adopt a character and engage in a situation in order to demonstrate problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication skills. This presentation will provide a rationale for using critical role plays in a variety of disciplines from research and personal experiences. A protocol for developing critical role plays (Densky & Ramirez, 2015) will be shared and implemented through a hands-on experience that educators from all disciplines will be able to connect with.

Statement

Used judiciously, critical role plays can allow learners to reach higher levels of cognitive processing that might otherwise be missed with more traditional classroom activities.

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Feb 19th, 11:20 AM Feb 19th, 12:00 PM

How Dramatic! Implementing a Pan Discipline Protocol for Developing Critical Role Plays

OM 3632

Role plays are not new activities. Many professional fields such as nursing (Jenkins & Turick-Gibson, 1999) use these techniques extensively. Language classrooms are also common places to find the implementation of role plays and simulations (Larocque, 1986; Piper, 1984). While role plays are enjoying a renewed legitimacy in student-centred classrooms, there is little evidence in the research of the significant effect these techniques can have in teaching and learning. The understanding of what constitutes a role play is broad; it can be as simple as students “pretending” to be customers in a restaurant or as complex as nursing students engaging in a mock cardiac arrest. These activities involve a degree of authentic communication, spontaneity, and lack of predictability; they “…reside in the middle ground between creative thought and real-world interaction” (Shapiro & Leopold, 2012, p.123). Shapiro and Leopold (2012) define critical role-play as requiring “students to embody voices and perspectives that may be quite different from their own” (p.123) and can therefore be cognitively challenging. In a critical role play, students may be asked to adopt a character and engage in a situation in order to demonstrate problem-solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication skills. This presentation will provide a rationale for using critical role plays in a variety of disciplines from research and personal experiences. A protocol for developing critical role plays (Densky & Ramirez, 2015) will be shared and implemented through a hands-on experience that educators from all disciplines will be able to connect with.