Proposal Title

On a Reflexive Practice of Indigenization, or the Absurdity of Teaching in a Post 400-ppm World

Presentation Type

Regular Presentation

Alternative Presentation Type:

reg_presentation

Location

OM 3612

Start Date

19-2-2018 11:20 AM

End Date

20-2-2018 12:00 PM

Proposal Abstract

In 2013, just after midnight on the 7th of May, the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere touched 400 parts per million for the first time in eons. We are now well on track to 450ppm at which point “catastrophic climate change becomes inevitable” (Hamilton, 2010). Our presentation is a call to explore the “absurdity” (Camus, 1984) of teaching in such times with a mind to stop “looking away” (Klein, 2014, p. 6) from our ecological crisis as we seek to integrate Indigenous worldviews into the Canadian educational experience at the primary, secondary and post-secondary levels. Calls to indigenize and ecologize curriculum in recent decades share similar rationales as well as similar challenges. Both require historical awareness of disturbing colonial legacies, acknowledgement of present socioeconomic and ecological injustices, and perhaps most importantly, the reflexive capacity to critique dominant worldviews and recognize the legitimacy of “other” ways of knowing and being. And yet, moves to indigenization, when rationalized through the dominant discourses of institutionalized ways of knowing, are often reduced to surface content knowledge and hollow gestures such as sitting in a circle, using oral storytelling, “getting back to nature,” or “exploring identity.” If we are to take indigenizing and ecologizing seriously, we need to work on the level of worldview by cultivating the reflexive capacities and discourse communities courageous enough to “stop looking away.” This presentation invites dialogue about the possibilities and challenges of teaching practices that seek to reflexively learn in and through (Donald, 2013) indigenous ways of knowing in a post 400-ppm world.

Technical Requirements:

NO.

Statement

This presentation invites dialogue about the possibilities and challenges of teaching practices that seek to reflexively learn in and through indigenous ways of knowing

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Feb 19th, 11:20 AM Feb 20th, 12:00 PM

On a Reflexive Practice of Indigenization, or the Absurdity of Teaching in a Post 400-ppm World

OM 3612

In 2013, just after midnight on the 7th of May, the carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere touched 400 parts per million for the first time in eons. We are now well on track to 450ppm at which point “catastrophic climate change becomes inevitable” (Hamilton, 2010). Our presentation is a call to explore the “absurdity” (Camus, 1984) of teaching in such times with a mind to stop “looking away” (Klein, 2014, p. 6) from our ecological crisis as we seek to integrate Indigenous worldviews into the Canadian educational experience at the primary, secondary and post-secondary levels. Calls to indigenize and ecologize curriculum in recent decades share similar rationales as well as similar challenges. Both require historical awareness of disturbing colonial legacies, acknowledgement of present socioeconomic and ecological injustices, and perhaps most importantly, the reflexive capacity to critique dominant worldviews and recognize the legitimacy of “other” ways of knowing and being. And yet, moves to indigenization, when rationalized through the dominant discourses of institutionalized ways of knowing, are often reduced to surface content knowledge and hollow gestures such as sitting in a circle, using oral storytelling, “getting back to nature,” or “exploring identity.” If we are to take indigenizing and ecologizing seriously, we need to work on the level of worldview by cultivating the reflexive capacities and discourse communities courageous enough to “stop looking away.” This presentation invites dialogue about the possibilities and challenges of teaching practices that seek to reflexively learn in and through (Donald, 2013) indigenous ways of knowing in a post 400-ppm world.