Proposal Title

2.3 Examining Practice for Inclusivity, Individualization and Positionality: Pursuing Authentic Practice in Adult Education

Presentation Type

Speed Presentation

Location

OM 3632

Start Date

19-2-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

19-2-2018 2:55 PM

Proposal Abstract

Practitioners in higher education are working with an increasingly diverse group of adult learners that include international, Aboriginal, and mature students; thus, balancing institutional requirements with the need to recognize a multiplicity of educational and cultural experiences while representing one’s own constantly evolving teaching philosophy is progressively more challenging. A practice characterized by authenticity and inclusivity seeks to achieve this balance. Research in this area is predominantly Eurocentric; nevertheless, an authentic practice seeks to recognize and support diversity, and therefore claims a significant role in the field of adult education. The purpose of this presentation is to share the findings of a research project informed by critical and transformative learning theory that sought to determine the extent to which individualization and multiplicity are recognized and represented in my practice, since this is an integral element of authentic teaching (Baumgartner and Johnson-Bailey, 2008; Cafarella & Clark, 1999; Kreber et al., 2007; Merriam, 2007). I describe modifications to my practice that reflect the importance of incorporating Indigenous and non-western perspectives (Merriam, 2007), as well as feminist and postfoundational theories that indicate how one might “embrace difference, voice, and multiplicity” (English, 2008, p. 123) of any learners. These modifications are adaptable to any practice, and I urge participants to think critically about how they might implement them in their own work. Further, I address the importance of acknowledging one’s positionality and the power and privilege it affords (Johnson-Bailey & Cervero, 2000; Johnson-Bailey, 2001; Kreber et al., 2007; Schick, 2000) in the pursuit of an inclusive practice.

Statement

Practitioners in higher education are working with an increasingly diverse group of adult learners that include international and Aboriginal students; thus, balancing institutional requirements with the need to recognize a multiplicity of educational and cultural experiences is imperative. This presentation addresses reaching through teaching through a lens of indigenization, internationalization and inclusivity.

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Feb 19th, 2:15 PM Feb 19th, 2:55 PM

2.3 Examining Practice for Inclusivity, Individualization and Positionality: Pursuing Authentic Practice in Adult Education

OM 3632

Practitioners in higher education are working with an increasingly diverse group of adult learners that include international, Aboriginal, and mature students; thus, balancing institutional requirements with the need to recognize a multiplicity of educational and cultural experiences while representing one’s own constantly evolving teaching philosophy is progressively more challenging. A practice characterized by authenticity and inclusivity seeks to achieve this balance. Research in this area is predominantly Eurocentric; nevertheless, an authentic practice seeks to recognize and support diversity, and therefore claims a significant role in the field of adult education. The purpose of this presentation is to share the findings of a research project informed by critical and transformative learning theory that sought to determine the extent to which individualization and multiplicity are recognized and represented in my practice, since this is an integral element of authentic teaching (Baumgartner and Johnson-Bailey, 2008; Cafarella & Clark, 1999; Kreber et al., 2007; Merriam, 2007). I describe modifications to my practice that reflect the importance of incorporating Indigenous and non-western perspectives (Merriam, 2007), as well as feminist and postfoundational theories that indicate how one might “embrace difference, voice, and multiplicity” (English, 2008, p. 123) of any learners. These modifications are adaptable to any practice, and I urge participants to think critically about how they might implement them in their own work. Further, I address the importance of acknowledging one’s positionality and the power and privilege it affords (Johnson-Bailey & Cervero, 2000; Johnson-Bailey, 2001; Kreber et al., 2007; Schick, 2000) in the pursuit of an inclusive practice.