Paper Title

[3.2] Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: When is There a Responsibility to Protect?

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

International Relations | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine is somewhat a reversal of traditional ideals of sovereignty, in which the international community have a shared responsibility to protect all people. This paper will seek to discover if this doctrine could be successfully applied in the Canadian context of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. If it cannot, the question must be asked: Is R2P even a valid norm, or is it nothing more than an agent of neocolonialism? Permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) have been documented trying to misappropriate the doctrine. If this is how the UNSC approaches the doctrine, we must ask: what was the true intention behind R2P? Canada, as a western settler-colonial state with disproportionate power on the world stage, is not likely to be seen as unstable or unable to protect their citizens. However, the Canadian state is documented to be manifestly failing to provide protection to its most vulnerable population, Indigenous women. The National Inquiry for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls determined that, according to the Genocide Convention, this crisis could be considered a genocide. I will argue that R2P could be applied to the Canadian context of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Additionally, I will also be asserting that it would never be used in this context due to the neocolonial roots of international politics. R2P, like the cosmopolitan ideology in which it is rooted, are noble ideals to work towards, but become much more problematic in practice.

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Jan 18th, 2:30 PM Jan 18th, 4:00 PM

[3.2] Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women: When is There a Responsibility to Protect?

IB 1020

The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine is somewhat a reversal of traditional ideals of sovereignty, in which the international community have a shared responsibility to protect all people. This paper will seek to discover if this doctrine could be successfully applied in the Canadian context of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. If it cannot, the question must be asked: Is R2P even a valid norm, or is it nothing more than an agent of neocolonialism? Permanent members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) have been documented trying to misappropriate the doctrine. If this is how the UNSC approaches the doctrine, we must ask: what was the true intention behind R2P? Canada, as a western settler-colonial state with disproportionate power on the world stage, is not likely to be seen as unstable or unable to protect their citizens. However, the Canadian state is documented to be manifestly failing to provide protection to its most vulnerable population, Indigenous women. The National Inquiry for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls determined that, according to the Genocide Convention, this crisis could be considered a genocide. I will argue that R2P could be applied to the Canadian context of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Additionally, I will also be asserting that it would never be used in this context due to the neocolonial roots of international politics. R2P, like the cosmopolitan ideology in which it is rooted, are noble ideals to work towards, but become much more problematic in practice.