Paper Title

[1.3] Jesus and the Empire: Christianity and the Civilizing Mission in New France and New Zealand

Location

IB 1014

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

History | Philosophy | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Jesus and the Empire focuses on missionaries and the role they played in the larger imperial narrative. I examine the role of Anglican Church Missionary Society in New Zealand during the late 18th and early 19th century, comparing it with the early Jesuit mission in New France during the 17th century. In comparing these two regions and time periods, I reveal the consistent imperial ideology that these missionary groups conflated with their religious ideology, even as they sought to separate themselves from the larger colonial framework in the later period. This is revealed through their interactions with contemporary politics and how they worked within and apart from the existing imperial framework. While the Jesuit missionaries saw themselves as part of the civilizing mission within the larger imperial ambitions of France, the CMS missionaries preferred to believe that they were acting apart from the British Empire. Yet they were still enacting many of the core ideas of civilization and progress that constituted British imperialism in the 19th century.

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Jan 18th, 1:00 PM Jan 18th, 2:15 PM

[1.3] Jesus and the Empire: Christianity and the Civilizing Mission in New France and New Zealand

IB 1014

Jesus and the Empire focuses on missionaries and the role they played in the larger imperial narrative. I examine the role of Anglican Church Missionary Society in New Zealand during the late 18th and early 19th century, comparing it with the early Jesuit mission in New France during the 17th century. In comparing these two regions and time periods, I reveal the consistent imperial ideology that these missionary groups conflated with their religious ideology, even as they sought to separate themselves from the larger colonial framework in the later period. This is revealed through their interactions with contemporary politics and how they worked within and apart from the existing imperial framework. While the Jesuit missionaries saw themselves as part of the civilizing mission within the larger imperial ambitions of France, the CMS missionaries preferred to believe that they were acting apart from the British Empire. Yet they were still enacting many of the core ideas of civilization and progress that constituted British imperialism in the 19th century.