Paper Title

[2.2] The Other Half of Healthcare: Successes, Failures, and Discrepancies in Canadian Mental Health Policy

Location

IB 1019

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In 2006, the Canadian Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology released their final report, "Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada". It critically examines the state of Canadian mental-healthcare through a recovery-oriented epistemology, supplemented by three pillars: choice, community, and integration. Put differently, the Report argues that consumers should have access to a variety of mental-healthcare services provided within their home locality and operated in tandem with both physical-healthcare and other social policies. It finds that Canadian mental-healthcare is in need of major reform and that the responsibility for this reform lies with both the provincial and federal governments. In its preliminary stages, my research will examine how Canadian mental healthcare policies have evolved since the 2006 Senate Report, particularly as they relate to the three pillars of recovery-oriented care, guided by these four questions: How do we define a public mental health crisis in terms of service availability and public experiences? Which pillars have been implemented in (and excluded from) provincial mental healthcare policies? Has the federal government adopted any of the recommendations within the Report? What are the recurring policy themes between the provinces? In brief, this project will examine the evolution of Canadian mental-healthcare services within a recovery-oriented framework, identify policy shortcomings and successes in each province, and compare these cases to find emerging mental health policy themes.

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Jan 18th, 2:30 PM Jan 18th, 4:00 PM

[2.2] The Other Half of Healthcare: Successes, Failures, and Discrepancies in Canadian Mental Health Policy

IB 1019

In 2006, the Canadian Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology released their final report, "Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada". It critically examines the state of Canadian mental-healthcare through a recovery-oriented epistemology, supplemented by three pillars: choice, community, and integration. Put differently, the Report argues that consumers should have access to a variety of mental-healthcare services provided within their home locality and operated in tandem with both physical-healthcare and other social policies. It finds that Canadian mental-healthcare is in need of major reform and that the responsibility for this reform lies with both the provincial and federal governments. In its preliminary stages, my research will examine how Canadian mental healthcare policies have evolved since the 2006 Senate Report, particularly as they relate to the three pillars of recovery-oriented care, guided by these four questions: How do we define a public mental health crisis in terms of service availability and public experiences? Which pillars have been implemented in (and excluded from) provincial mental healthcare policies? Has the federal government adopted any of the recommendations within the Report? What are the recurring policy themes between the provinces? In brief, this project will examine the evolution of Canadian mental-healthcare services within a recovery-oriented framework, identify policy shortcomings and successes in each province, and compare these cases to find emerging mental health policy themes.