Paper Title

[1.2] The Dangerous Evolution of War In the Lense of The Beothuk Extinction

Location

IB 1014

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

History | Philosophy | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The Beothuk or the aboriginal people of Newfoundland were a shadowy group of people. Historians today know very little about their culture and demise in 1829. This paper will examine the collapse of the Beothuk world and the drastic change which happened to their lives and culture after European contact in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries which eventually led to the extinction of the whole race in 1829. It will also show the fast and dangerous evolution of war over time from controlling lands, food sources and spreading epidemics to cyber wars like the Stuxnet computer worm which attacked computers at the nuclear facility in Iran in 2010. The aim of this paper is to show how human’s overwhelming search for power may eradicate mankind. First of all, the Beothuk lived a hunter gatherer and nomadic lifestyle. They depended on the see for food. They used to hunt for fish, clams, flounder, salmon, and other marine resources. In summer and early fall, they camped to rivers to fish, arrange weddings and trade. All this drastically changed after European contact. The Europeans established settlements on the coast, on the traditional points of the Beothuk. Moreover, they were adept at using firearms which the Beothuk did not even touch. They also spread new kinds of epidemics as they settled. They also disrupted the migratory roots of the caribou which was another animal the Beothuk depended on for food. All these factors led to their extinction. To link this to the modern era, Stuxnet was developed by the united states to devastate programmable logic controllers (PLCs), To collect information on Iran’s computer’s to attack themselves. Finally, human’s search for power may one day lead to our extinction.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 18th, 10:30 AM Jan 18th, 11:45 AM

[1.2] The Dangerous Evolution of War In the Lense of The Beothuk Extinction

IB 1014

The Beothuk or the aboriginal people of Newfoundland were a shadowy group of people. Historians today know very little about their culture and demise in 1829. This paper will examine the collapse of the Beothuk world and the drastic change which happened to their lives and culture after European contact in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries which eventually led to the extinction of the whole race in 1829. It will also show the fast and dangerous evolution of war over time from controlling lands, food sources and spreading epidemics to cyber wars like the Stuxnet computer worm which attacked computers at the nuclear facility in Iran in 2010. The aim of this paper is to show how human’s overwhelming search for power may eradicate mankind. First of all, the Beothuk lived a hunter gatherer and nomadic lifestyle. They depended on the see for food. They used to hunt for fish, clams, flounder, salmon, and other marine resources. In summer and early fall, they camped to rivers to fish, arrange weddings and trade. All this drastically changed after European contact. The Europeans established settlements on the coast, on the traditional points of the Beothuk. Moreover, they were adept at using firearms which the Beothuk did not even touch. They also spread new kinds of epidemics as they settled. They also disrupted the migratory roots of the caribou which was another animal the Beothuk depended on for food. All these factors led to their extinction. To link this to the modern era, Stuxnet was developed by the united states to devastate programmable logic controllers (PLCs), To collect information on Iran’s computer’s to attack themselves. Finally, human’s search for power may one day lead to our extinction.