Paper Title

[3.1] Suffering and Self: An Exploration of the Buddhist Nature of Nietzsche's Concept of the Dionysian

Presenter Information

Liam H. Fraser, TRUFollow

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

English Language and Literature | Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Over several years I have continuously returned to Nietzsche’s Apollonian-Dionysian dichotomy and used it to develop my personal philosophy. The Dionysian lens is a particularly interesting tool when confronting suffering; as there is no logic or reason present in a Dionysian state, creating a more natural conflict of the emotions. The difficulty in communicating Nietzsche is that there are so many directions one can take with his concepts. One could easily speak on the Dionysian influence on art, but that does not seem as philosophically pressing. The possible rectification of the abundance of content within the Dionysian is found within Four Noble Truths of the Buddha and The Doctrine of Not-Self. So in exploring the Nietzschean transformation of the Dionysian and subsequent acceptance of suffering, I will be stepping towards Buddhism. The communication of the abject truth of suffering aids in the acceptance of Nietzsche’s nihilistic philosophy. However, this study is not nihilistic in nature, but an exploration of concepts surrounding suffering. Nietzsche’s Dionysian, as presented in The Birth of Tragedy and Ecce Homo, is a philosophy that works towards the acceptance of suffering in life, becoming intertwined with dharma and traditional Buddhism.

Comments

Key Words: Nietzsche

Suffering

Dionysian

Buddhism

The Four Noble Truths

Philosophy

Acceptance

Dharma

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Jan 18th, 10:30 AM Jan 18th, 11:45 AM

[3.1] Suffering and Self: An Exploration of the Buddhist Nature of Nietzsche's Concept of the Dionysian

IB 1020

Over several years I have continuously returned to Nietzsche’s Apollonian-Dionysian dichotomy and used it to develop my personal philosophy. The Dionysian lens is a particularly interesting tool when confronting suffering; as there is no logic or reason present in a Dionysian state, creating a more natural conflict of the emotions. The difficulty in communicating Nietzsche is that there are so many directions one can take with his concepts. One could easily speak on the Dionysian influence on art, but that does not seem as philosophically pressing. The possible rectification of the abundance of content within the Dionysian is found within Four Noble Truths of the Buddha and The Doctrine of Not-Self. So in exploring the Nietzschean transformation of the Dionysian and subsequent acceptance of suffering, I will be stepping towards Buddhism. The communication of the abject truth of suffering aids in the acceptance of Nietzsche’s nihilistic philosophy. However, this study is not nihilistic in nature, but an exploration of concepts surrounding suffering. Nietzsche’s Dionysian, as presented in The Birth of Tragedy and Ecce Homo, is a philosophy that works towards the acceptance of suffering in life, becoming intertwined with dharma and traditional Buddhism.