Paper Title

[3.3] MOSES AND DE LORD: The Biography of Harriet Tubman

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

American Studies | Constitutional Law | Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | History | History of Gender | Law and Race | United States History | Women's History | Women's Studies

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Although the legacy of Harriet Tubman is largely defined by the Underground Railway during the Reconstruction and Civil War eras, she was also an unsung militant hero of the Civil War. Her contributions aside from the Underground Railway have been overlooked by many, despite her having played a crucial role in shaping American history during the 19th century. This paper focuses on her childhood experiences as a slave, her direct and indirect contributions to the Union army during the Civil War, and her contributions to the American society post-war. Harriet Tubman served as a liaison between African Americans behind Union lines and to the Federal General Staff of the Union. Tubman influenced many other African Americans to assist the Union during the Civil War and to partake in espionage. Tubman herself was a scout, a spy, a nurse, and a cook in the Civil War. Post-Civil War she purchased land on which she provided a home for elderly African Americans who were previously slaves in the South. Not only did Tubman aid in the liberation of roughly three hundred Black slaves to the North through the Underground Railway, she later assisted them in the transition to economic sufficiency. Beyond the Civil War, Harriet Tubman served in the Women's Suffrage Movement. She was able to help advocate for the rights of the women's vote until her death in 1913. Harriet Tubman was a true testament to the resilience of African American women.

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Jan 18th, 1:00 PM Jan 18th, 2:15 PM

[3.3] MOSES AND DE LORD: The Biography of Harriet Tubman

IB 1020

Although the legacy of Harriet Tubman is largely defined by the Underground Railway during the Reconstruction and Civil War eras, she was also an unsung militant hero of the Civil War. Her contributions aside from the Underground Railway have been overlooked by many, despite her having played a crucial role in shaping American history during the 19th century. This paper focuses on her childhood experiences as a slave, her direct and indirect contributions to the Union army during the Civil War, and her contributions to the American society post-war. Harriet Tubman served as a liaison between African Americans behind Union lines and to the Federal General Staff of the Union. Tubman influenced many other African Americans to assist the Union during the Civil War and to partake in espionage. Tubman herself was a scout, a spy, a nurse, and a cook in the Civil War. Post-Civil War she purchased land on which she provided a home for elderly African Americans who were previously slaves in the South. Not only did Tubman aid in the liberation of roughly three hundred Black slaves to the North through the Underground Railway, she later assisted them in the transition to economic sufficiency. Beyond the Civil War, Harriet Tubman served in the Women's Suffrage Movement. She was able to help advocate for the rights of the women's vote until her death in 1913. Harriet Tubman was a true testament to the resilience of African American women.