Paper Title

[3.2] Renegotiating the United States Military Academy's Position in Post Civil War America

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

History | Other History | United States History

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

During the period following the civil war period in America, The United States Military Academy (West Point) has often been regarded to have become obsolete. Colleges and universities were established in the United States by West Point’s emergence as an institution in 1802, but they followed the classical and theological curriculum which offered little to support the fledgling nation’s government as it seeks to expand dominion over their vast territory and develop industry. To fully establish dominion over the continent required scientific exploitation of resources and systematic subjugation of distance through technology. Scholars often do not recognize the change in demand of engineering education and the continued relevancy of West Point’s scholarship in emerging science schools such as Sheffield. At the turn of the century, West Point was not recognized as a valid school of science and engineering stemming from a disdain for military institutions by scholars. While the intention of the West Point had fully embraced the training of competent officers in the Gilded Age, West Point continued to provide a competitive education in civil and military engineering. Additionally, previous graduates have long integrated with civilian economic demands and are reflected in the varied careers of graduates outside the military. Analysis of West Point's influence outside the military in civilian industrial and educational institutions offers a new narrative in which places West Point inside the rise of science-based education in America.

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Jan 18th, 1:00 PM Jan 18th, 2:15 PM

[3.2] Renegotiating the United States Military Academy's Position in Post Civil War America

IB 1020

During the period following the civil war period in America, The United States Military Academy (West Point) has often been regarded to have become obsolete. Colleges and universities were established in the United States by West Point’s emergence as an institution in 1802, but they followed the classical and theological curriculum which offered little to support the fledgling nation’s government as it seeks to expand dominion over their vast territory and develop industry. To fully establish dominion over the continent required scientific exploitation of resources and systematic subjugation of distance through technology. Scholars often do not recognize the change in demand of engineering education and the continued relevancy of West Point’s scholarship in emerging science schools such as Sheffield. At the turn of the century, West Point was not recognized as a valid school of science and engineering stemming from a disdain for military institutions by scholars. While the intention of the West Point had fully embraced the training of competent officers in the Gilded Age, West Point continued to provide a competitive education in civil and military engineering. Additionally, previous graduates have long integrated with civilian economic demands and are reflected in the varied careers of graduates outside the military. Analysis of West Point's influence outside the military in civilian industrial and educational institutions offers a new narrative in which places West Point inside the rise of science-based education in America.