Paper Title

[2.1] Sexual Exploitation & Abuse by UN Peacekeepers

Location

IB 1019

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

International Humanitarian Law | Other Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the development and effectiveness of United Nations Sexual Abuse and Exploitation (SEA) policy. Beginning with an explanation of how instances of SEA by UN personnel were discovered within peacekeeping operations of the 1990s. Then transitioning to the current objectives of SEA policy and the institutions designed to execute them. Each element of the policy is then critically examined based on its fulfillment of local needs and whether offenders are accountable for their actions. I will outline the three primary weaknesses of SEA policy and accountability: the multifaceted nature of SEA, lack of integration with gender initiatives, and the lack of international legislation. Addressed throughout the analysis is the role of gender and gendered binaries. Concluding policy recommendations focus on the integration of SEA policy with the principles of Security Council Resolution 1325 as well as establishing legal accountability for all UN personnel, regardless of their nationality.

Comments

This paper was published in the Queen's University Politicus Undergraduate Journal Spring 2019 and the content was expanded upon during my time at the Bader International Study Centre International Law & Politics Program (Winter 2019).

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Jan 18th, 9:00 AM Jan 18th, 10:15 AM

[2.1] Sexual Exploitation & Abuse by UN Peacekeepers

IB 1019

This paper provides an overview of the development and effectiveness of United Nations Sexual Abuse and Exploitation (SEA) policy. Beginning with an explanation of how instances of SEA by UN personnel were discovered within peacekeeping operations of the 1990s. Then transitioning to the current objectives of SEA policy and the institutions designed to execute them. Each element of the policy is then critically examined based on its fulfillment of local needs and whether offenders are accountable for their actions. I will outline the three primary weaknesses of SEA policy and accountability: the multifaceted nature of SEA, lack of integration with gender initiatives, and the lack of international legislation. Addressed throughout the analysis is the role of gender and gendered binaries. Concluding policy recommendations focus on the integration of SEA policy with the principles of Security Council Resolution 1325 as well as establishing legal accountability for all UN personnel, regardless of their nationality.