Paper Title

[2.2] Striking Oil: A Critical Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility as ‘Bad Development’ in African Extractive Industries in the Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

Location

AE 263

Start Date

January 2020

End Date

January 2020

Disciplines

History | Philosophy | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives have become a norm within extractive industries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Stakeholder engagement surrounding the relative success of such efforts is often presented as mutually beneficial for or involved actors, as business and development agendas are believed to converge where socially responsible business conduct meets with corporate legitimacy claims. However, due to their robustness depending on the non-legally binding discretion of extractive MNCs, CSR community development programs are often poorly planned and executed. This essay will attempt to answer the question: how is power unevenly exercised in the transactions between the stakeholders of oil MNCs, resource-cursed African petro-states, NGOs and local communities at extractive sites? Through the case study of the Chad-Cameroon pipeline, this essay will argue that impoverished African states (and their communities) are at an inherent structural disadvantage in the international political economy as they continue to depend on the private investment of advanced industrialized economies not only for the refinery of their oil exports but also for the CSR developments projects themselves.

Comments

file:///Users/kennedyryan/Desktop/POLI%20581%20Striking%20Oil%20CSR%20.edited%5B1%5D.html

Key words:

Corporate social responsibility (CSR)

Multinational corporations (MNCs)

Sub-Saharan Africa

Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

Development

Global Governance

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Jan 17th, 2:30 PM Jan 17th, 3:45 PM

[2.2] Striking Oil: A Critical Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility as ‘Bad Development’ in African Extractive Industries in the Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

AE 263

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives have become a norm within extractive industries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Stakeholder engagement surrounding the relative success of such efforts is often presented as mutually beneficial for or involved actors, as business and development agendas are believed to converge where socially responsible business conduct meets with corporate legitimacy claims. However, due to their robustness depending on the non-legally binding discretion of extractive MNCs, CSR community development programs are often poorly planned and executed. This essay will attempt to answer the question: how is power unevenly exercised in the transactions between the stakeholders of oil MNCs, resource-cursed African petro-states, NGOs and local communities at extractive sites? Through the case study of the Chad-Cameroon pipeline, this essay will argue that impoverished African states (and their communities) are at an inherent structural disadvantage in the international political economy as they continue to depend on the private investment of advanced industrialized economies not only for the refinery of their oil exports but also for the CSR developments projects themselves.