Friday, January 17th

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2020
Friday, January 17th
11:30 AM

Registration & Information Table

Registration Table

International Building Lobby

11:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Presenters must sign in here and can pick up their nametags & giveaway bags. Attendees must register here. Questions about the conference? Come see us here.

12:00 PM

Lunch

Lunch Break

IB 1014

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

We will open the conference with a complimentary lunch for all attendees, presenters & moderators!

1:00 PM

[1.1] Revolutionary Woman: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Discrimination on the Basis of Sex

Kaitlin E. Flinn, Ryerson University

IB 1007

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

The history of gender discrimination has been a long and tremulous road. The study of this history has been able to showcase powerful women who stood against the societal norms to transform gender discrimination and turn it into opportunity. Standing in the present it is hard to imagine what women had to endure in years past to allow women today to do simple things such as vote, work, and getting an education. The progression of women’s rights has created an interest in looking at the responsibility specific women of the past have had on achieving these basic rights. This paper focuses on one pivotal woman, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. One of the most vital women in the advancement of women’s rights by fighting for the transformation of United States law to acknowledge gender equality. She faced some of the most severe obstacles solely on the basis of her gender, however, she used them as motivation to challenge the laws of the United States, specifically, the Fourteenth Amendment that did not reflect the changing society. The key cases she argued for such as Reed v. Reed (1971), are analyzed, including groundbreaking opinions she made as a Supreme Court Justice like United States v. Virginia (1996). The study of her life, cases, and overall career demonstrate the true magnitude of the contributions she has made to the transformation of gender equality and how she is a key figure in how women have been able to begin to shatter these glass ceilings.

[1.2] She Haw!: She Haw!: How Rodeo Queens and Cowgirls Reflected Gender Ideologies in the Twentieth Century

Alex Horsman, Thompson Rivers University

IB 1007

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

Though the American frontier was deemed closed in the 1890s, cowboys and cowgirls did not disappear into history. Rather, rodeos emerged as a means of entertainment that allowed audiences to watch the wild west, they so admired. Though rodeos quickly became a hyper-masculinized event, cowgirls carved out a place for themselves, consequently becoming some of the earliest female athletes. Additionally, rodeo queens also emerged as a feminine component to the festivities. As Canada and the United States entered the Second World War, however, both cowgirls and rodeo queens saw a dramatic shift in their roles in rodeos across the continent due to changing gender ideologies. This paper will argue that, though cowgirls were early participants in rodeos, the years following the Second World War pushed women back into the private sphere thus restricting female participation in rodeos. Conversely, though rodeo queens had been reduced to beauty pageant participants, the role eventually opened opportunities for women to enter the rodeo once again. To support my argument, I use a mixture of primary and secondary sources such as newspaper articles.

[1.3] “Alcohol is a Poison”: Textbooks, Temperance, and Women’s Rights in late 19th Century British Columbia

Emily Stremel, University of Victoria

IB 1007

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

The BC Historical Textbooks Collection, at the University of Victoria McPherson Library, is the subject of a digital archiving project. The collection documents the materials used in the early British Columbia education system. One such book in the collection, the 1896 Gage’s Health Series, Book II, a textbook for high school students, heavily emphasizes abstinence from alcohol as a physiological and moral prerequisite for healthy living. My research contextualizes the book within contemporary political activities of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the Local Council of Women. The latter was a Victoria BC organization which focused on promoting women’s rights to the BC Provincial Government. At the time Gage’s Health Series, Book II was published, the Local Council of Women pushed for the inclusion of women on school boards. This was done to put pro-temperance activists on school boards throughout BC, ultimately to include temperance in the BC curriculum. Given the temperance movement’s connection to Canada’s broader settler-colonial/Anglo-Saxon nation-building project, this textbook demonstrates an attempt at including an assimilationist policy in the early BC curriculum.

[2.1] "Femmes, Fables, and Foibles in Sport": An Examination of the Relationship Between the Second World War and the Success of the 1944-1945 Vancouver Hedlunds Women's Basketball Team.

Kylie Wall, University of the Fraser Valley

AE 263

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

"Femmes, Fables, and Foibles in Sport" provides insight into the role women played on the home front in Vancouver during the Second World War through the lens of the Vancouver Hedlunds Women's Basketball team. This team existed only between 1939-1945 and, as a result, their experiences closely mirrored the overall female experience in Vancouver during the War. This paper examines the specific conditions created by the War and the role this had not only on the Hedlunds and their rise to fame as Canadian Champions, but also on the new roles women were expected to undertake during the War.

[2.2] Not just bread and circuses: Spectator sport in the era of mass media as a potent tool for preparing viewers to support the perpetual wars of late capitalism.

Lyn Richards Ms., Thompson Rivers University

AE 263

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

Spectator sports capture the time and attention of millions of viewers every day. For most, sports are viewed through electronic media. This is an unprecedented opportunity for molding attitudes globally. How can watching spectator sports contribute to the development of attitudes that support war? To what extent are nationalist and military themes introduced in sports presentations? Who pays for patriotic and military displays at sports events? What wars require promotion to increase war-acceptance? Who benefits from the inculcation of war-acceptance? These are questions I will address briefly through review of evidence and images that reveal a growing association between spectator sports and patriotic militarism.

[2.3] "Splendid Condition and Enormous 'Grit'": The Sporting "Other" and the Canadian Identity

Cassidy L. Jean Miss, Thompson Rivers University

AE 263

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

The ink was barely dry on the British North America Act when Canada won its first international sport victory. Canadian identity is mutable, changing in response to outside influences. This phenomenon is especially apparent in sport. This paper focuses on the formation and maintenance of Canadian identity in sport. By connecting three significant examples, the 1867 Paris rowing crew and the 1972 Summit Series, and the 2019 NBA championship, this paper seeks to investigate how Canadian identity has been shaped through sport. Using newspaper articles, online editorials, and academic sources, this paper shows how integral the sporting “other” is to the Canadian identity.

[3.1] Martin Luther: The Moderate Mystic

Kennedy Garrett

IB 1014

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

While it is known that Martin Luther was influenced by mystics when he was an Augustinian friar, many scholars do not look at Luther within a mystical context. While Luther may not adhere to the typical model of mysticism, we could potentially see Luther as a ‘moderate’ mystic. Luther was directly influenced by The Theologia Germanica, which served as his introduction to mysticism, and Johannes Tauler. Tauler and the author of The Theologia Germanica were in turn highly influenced by Meister Eckhart. Thus Eckhart’s idea of self-annihilation reverberated through Tauler and Luther, albeit with some modification. Luther, Tauler and Eckhart all speak of the internal journey we must make to have oneness with God, however, for Tauler and Eckhart the journey entails the rejection of outward experiences. To Luther, however, the external life should carry on as before, while internally being on a different spiritual level. When we look at the writings of Luther we can see the mystical influence of Eckhart and Tauler, however, these mystical leanings do not position Luther as a true mystic, rather a ‘moderate’ one.

[3.2] Religious Symbolism in The Amarna Style: Understanding Akhenaten

Elisabeth Allchin, Thompson Rivers University

IB 1014

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

The 16 years that Akhenaten ruled Egypt - the Amarna Period - are widely regarded as one of the most turbulent periods in its history. In the fifth year of his rule, the New Kingdom pharaoh renamed himself, built a new capital city, and forced polytheistic Egypt into a monotheistic religion. In this period which began and ended with Akhenaten's rule, the empire was in turmoil but artists flourished. Depictions of the pharaoh changed wildly from depictions shown just a generation before, taking on an expressive form, and religion was closely tied to the Amarna Style as artists took care to depict Akhenaten as an androgynous figure for religious reasons. During the Amarna Period, Akhenaten's enforcement of the Aten as the sole deity of Egypt caused a dramatic change, both artistically and theologically.

[3.3] Donatists and Circumcellions: Where is The Connection?

Dana T. Melanson, Saint Francis Xavier University

IB 1014

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

The Donatists were called heretics by the Roman North African Church from 310 CE to 411 CE. Their two major offenses against the church were their interpretation of scripture and belief in rebaptism; earning them the title heretical schismatics. A second group, the Circumcellions, were present in the same regions of North Africa. Their two major offenses were violent acts against the church and declaring their deaths to be martyrdom in the name of Christ. They are infamous for hurling themselves from cliffs and threatening travelers with death unless the travelers killed them; affirming their devotion to Christ. Throughout centuries of academic literature, these two groups have traditionally been amalgamated; including the more detailed works by WHC Frend. However, St. Augustine and St. Optatus, two relevant figures of the church during this period who wrote extensively on the schism, provide no evidence that reveals the correlation to link the Donatists and Circumcellions as one and the same. Despite this, they are constantly referred to as “the Donatist Circumcellions” when scholars refer to violent actions or conflict against the North African Church at this period in history. This paper argues that the Donatists and Circumcellions should not be represented as a singular entity as presented in past research, and the general acceptance that they are needs to be brought into question. This false linkage leads to misunderstanding about who these people were, and what each of these groups represented in the early history of the church.

2:30 PM

[1.1] Mechanisms of Authoritarian Diffusion vs. Democracy: Implications for Transitional Justice in Asia

Keasa Davies, University of Calgary

IB 1007

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

This paper examines the regional effects of Military Junta's and the People's Republic of China on democratic consolidation in Southeast Asia. Liberal democracy is a critical component in ensuring the implementation and upholding of human rights, as well as the prevention of intra-state conflict. Additionally, democratization and transitional justice are mutually reinforcing as both seek to increase accountability, transparency and horizontal power dispersion, however democratization and transitional justice remain largely externally-imposed processes. In Southeast Asia, largely as a result of the prominence of Military Junta's and the regional influence of the People's Republic of China, attempts at democratization are met with equal resistance from non-democratic or authoritarian pressures, which prevent the consolidation of effective liberal democracy and promote further regional destabilization. It is not until these mechanisms which work against the consolidation of liberal democracy are overcome regionally that transitional justice, and the subsequent upholding of human rights standards and norms can be applied in Southeast Asia. Keywords: Liberal Democracy, Transitional Justice, Human Rights, Southeast Asia, People's Republic of China

[1.2] Hong Kong And The World: The Political & Economic Implications Of Anti-Government In Asia's Financial Crisis

Cole M R Hickson CMRH, TRU

IB 1007

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Hong Kong is widely recommended as Asia's financial capital and has long been a portal between West and East commerce. However, the increasing civil unrest in regards to an encroaching China has lead many to some spectators to argue Hong Kong's preeminent status as Asia's business might be in jeopardy. This presentation will look at the causes and impacts of these protests from both a political and economic perspective as well as the likely implications on a local, regional, and global scale.

[1.3] Israel - A Star in the East

Rowan Huff Froese

IB 1007

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Researcher: Rowan Huff Froese Presentation Title: Israel – A Star in the East Research Focus: Philosophy, History and Politics School: Thompson Rivers University | Arts Department Presentation Type: Oral and Visual

Abstract: This research paper will look at one of the most debated and volatile states in the modern world, that is the state of Israel. With much controversy surrounding Israel, it’s creation, and current policy, this paper will take a secular look at her history and significance. Judaism is the longest-lasting monotheistic religion and has laid roots in the region now known as Israel, and the Jewish claim to this land has a strong case. This paper will seek to examine whether the Jewish people have a more legitimate claim than other groups who call the region home. Moreover, this paper will examine the reasons for Israel’s founding in 1948 and the experience of Jews before that date. Jews have faced persecution in many of the positions they have found themselves in throughout the centuries. This persecution culminated in the Holocaust of the 1940s. Through this, the paper will look at the history and roots of anti-Semitism, as well as its impact in today’s world. Despite this bigotry, the Jewish spirit has stayed strong. Today their national home provides them with the ability to protect their vital interests. The modern state of Israel provides a high quality of life for its citizens, as a democracy and a protector of human rights. However, Israel’s treatment of Palestine blemishes this record and this paper will emphasise the importance of criticism directed at Israel, so that lasting solutions can be built for all peoples. In conclusion, Israel is an important state for a Jewish minority who has faced persecution for many millennia but should be examined at with the same level of scrutiny as any other nation.

[2.1] The Use of Beauty: Evoking Forest Ecosystem Relationships through Installation Art in the Context of a Climate Emergency

Lyn Richards Ms., Thompson Rivers University

AE 263

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

There is an urgent need to address the present climate emergency. Increasing planetary forest cover is a benign strategy for mitigating and adapting to the effect of CO2 emissions on global climate. Didactic presentation of the value of forest cover in addressing climate change can provide information, but may not induce positive emotional responses that increase a viewer’s sense of engagement with the issues. Deeper understanding of the dire situation facing the Earth may even evoke anxiety that paralyzes action. Visual art that evokes a positive emotional response can increase a viewer’s sense of engagement with the material presented, enhance learning and increase goal-oriented behavior, including motivation to act. This installation is designed to enhance viewers’ understanding of a key process supporting forest ecosystem health: nutrient sharing between trees is mediated by the underground fungal network and is supported by plant species diversity. In this installation, light moving within and between knitted tree structures will evoke the transport of photosynthetic products from the forest canopy down to tree roots and through the mycorrhizal network under the forest floor to other trees. An audio component will give information about these issues as well as evocative literary readings about trees. Three pilot projects for this installation produced initial evidence of positive engagement and good information retention over a year after viewing.

[2.2] Striking Oil: A Critical Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility as ‘Bad Development’ in African Extractive Industries in the Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

Kennedy L. Ryan, University of Calgary

AE 263

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives have become a norm within extractive industries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Stakeholder engagement surrounding the relative success of such efforts is often presented as mutually beneficial for or involved actors, as business and development agendas are believed to converge where socially responsible business conduct meets with corporate legitimacy claims. However, due to their robustness depending on the non-legally binding discretion of extractive MNCs, CSR community development programs are often poorly planned and executed. This essay will attempt to answer the question: how is power unevenly exercised in the transactions between the stakeholders of oil MNCs, resource-cursed African petro-states, NGOs and local communities at extractive sites? Through the case study of the Chad-Cameroon pipeline, this essay will argue that impoverished African states (and their communities) are at an inherent structural disadvantage in the international political economy as they continue to depend on the private investment of advanced industrialized economies not only for the refinery of their oil exports but also for the CSR developments projects themselves.

[2.3] Dust and Denial: The Dust Bowl and the Seeds of Climate Denialism

Joe Flanagan, Thompson Rivers University

AE 263

2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

The 1930s Dust Bowls were not the first man-made ecological catastrophe; however, they were one of the first crises in which government officials and other keen observers recognized that America’s capitalist ethos, which prioritizes limitless growth and the exploitation of natural resources, exacerbated the underlying causes of soil erosion to the point of disaster. Despite recognizing the problem as cultural, government reports recommended structural and technological solution, while cultural representations of the Dust Bowls reinforced the socio-economic narratives that precipitated the Dust Bowls. The scale and symbolic power of the dust storms set a precedence for responding to and evaluating future ecological crises. The initial reluctance to challenge destructive and unsustainable cultural practices in the wake of the Dust Bowls set an institutional and cultural precedent that has mutated into a spectrum of modern climate denialism that either rejects responsibility for climate change altogether, or denies the necessity of systemic changes to address industrial capitalism’s wholesale destruction of the planet.

4:00 PM

[1.1] “Racist, but not Racist Enough”: An Analysis of the Cultural Warning and the Omission of Materials in Disney Plus

Kristen Jacobsen, Thompson Rivers Unversity

IB 1007

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

Although Disney Plus was only released to the public on November 12th, 2019, it is already gaining a huge amount of popularity. Disney announced that they had 10 million subscribers within 24 hours of its launch, and continued to gain over a million subscribers each day since. However, as is commonly seen, with great popularity comes great controversy. In the case of Disney Plus, the subject of this controversy is the content in some of its older films, and how they continue to ethically distribute materials that are racist, sexist, or contain otherwise prejudiced themes. To try and appease the people who say they should not be distributed, Disney Plus has put cultural warnings on a few of its films, reading “This program is presented as it was originally created. It may contain outdated cultural depictions”. The warning has thus far been put on the original Dumbo, Peter Pan, the original Lady and the Tramp, the original Jungle Book, and the Aristocats. To take it a step further, Disney Plus has also taken the liberty of removing certain movies, most notably Song of the South, because of its racist depictions of black people. My goal is to look a bit further into the distinctions between movies that were removed, movies that received a cultural warning, and movies that were made available on Disney Plus with no warning attached to them, although they also contain inaccurate cultural representations. I will take a philosophical lens in analyzing the differences between the three categories.

[1.2] Queer Fashion as Resistance

Jennica Wlodarczyk, Thompson Rivers University

IB 1007

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

In the media, fashion is widely associated with both consumerism and conformity, and many have questioned whether or not these forces can be resisted by individuals. Fashion has been used as a symbol of resistance and individuality by many subcultures around the world, including the queer community. Queer people have been using fashion as a tool of resistance throughout history, subverting cisgender, heterosexual norms through their dress. This group has reported feeling marginalized by mainstream clothing brands, and has used clothing in a symbolic manner in order to tell alternate stories and celebrate non-normative identities. Marginalized bodies are not included in mainstream discussions of fashion, yet queer fashion has created space for people of colour, people of size, trans and gender non-conforming people, and other individuals within the LGBTQ+ community. Queer fashion has acted as a tool of social resistance through its subversive response to marginalization, its use of symbols, and the ways in which it strengthens queer community.

Keywords: Fashion, gender, queer, LGBTQ+

[1.3] Fashion: A Tool of Social Dominance by the Conversion of Resistance Trends into Capitalist Propaganda.

Archisman Mitra, Thompson Rivers University

IB 1007

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

In this fast paced 21st Century world, it is quite trendy to be able to question and ratify with logical reasoning, the decisions we undertake in our daily lives and the consequences that are resulted from such actions. One can argue that the most basic, yet the biggest individual action we repeat everyday without fail is adhering to ‘Fashion’ standards, in the sense that clothes have become one of the essential requirements of life. ‘Fashion’, as described by Georg Simmel is “a form of imitation of social equalization”, which is changing constantly. It differentiates one time from another and one social stratum from another and unites those of a social class and segregates them from others. Hence according to Simmel, fashion is an “unique tool” for the Capitalist system which is used as a form of social dominance over the society. Simmel states, “the elite initiates a fashion and, when the mass imitates it to obliterate the external distinctions of class, abandons it for a newer mode-a process that quickens with the increase of wealth.” As a believer of this argument, I find myself at task to elaborate on how ‘Fashion’ is a tool for social dominance by the capitalist system, through conversion of new independent ‘Fashion’ standards into ‘modern trends’ and hence in turn ensuring an increase of wealth for the already wealthy manufacturers. I hanker to re-articulate my argument through examples of various thinkers and their works which would serve my case in conclusion.

[2.1] From the Legalisation of Birth Control to Sexual Assault Law Reform in Canada

Faith Thomson, Carleton University

AE 263

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

This essay examines link between the legalization of oral contraceptives in Canada in 1969 and the subsequent changes in sexual assault law reform in Canada in 1983. It argues that the legalisation of birth control in Canada had an explosive effect on gender roles within society, gave fuel to women’s liberation and laid the groundwork for far-reaching legal changes. Birth control affected women’s sexual revolution because, once the Pill was acquired, women retained some level of bodily autonomy; a new privilege not previously granted to them. Women’s newfound ability to control their body increased their confidence and independence. This confidence led many to the challenge of gender roles within society, specifically, gender roles within the institution of marriage. The challenge of ingrained gender roles within marriage was a significant contributor to the women’s liberation movement. The sexual assault law reform was a result of women’s growing voices against gendered and patriarchal legal systems. One of the various ways that the women’s liberation movement changed the sexual assault law reform, specifically, married women, was the discontinuance of spousal immunity from sexual assault and the inclusion of spouses as possible victims of sexual assaults. I will examine gender roles and expectations within marriage before the legalisation of the oral contraceptive and compare them to gender roles and expectations after the legalisation of oral contraceptives. I will do this through an analysis of “handbooks” and legal documents explaining indecent assault, rape, and sexual assault, books on marriage counselling and family planning handbooks.

[2.2] No Crown without Cooking: Analysis of Disney Princesses Reaffirming Traditional Gender Stereotypes

Jeenat Gill, Thompson Rivers University

AE 263

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

Walt Disney made classic fairytales an accessible and popular form of entertainment in the medium of film. Most of the Disney Studios movies are targeted towards children and have been transformed into age appropriate tales. Increasingly, Disney has marketed their trademark Disney Princesses to young girls and since the escalation of the feminist movement, have been claiming to be changing with the times to acclimate their princesses to be independent young women. Yet with this shift to a more feminist approach to the tales, many princesses stay a secondary character to their male counterparts and are used as props in the film to take care of the male characters in the film. Many are confined to a stereotypical motherly role with their needs and desires coming second to the male’s needs and desires. This paper analyzes how those traditional gender roles are still prevalent in Disney films despite being advertised as heroine tales and how these underlying themes can be construed as sexist. This paper utilizes academic journals with my interpretation of Disney films to analyze the historically sexist and gender-conforming themes of Disney films that may be negatively impacting young children.

[2.3] The Legacy of Wifely Transgression in Homer’s Odyssey

Leanne Buttery Mrs, Grant MacEwan Community College

AE 263

4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

In greek myth many of the mortal wives violate the patriarchal structures imposed on them to some varying degree of success or disaster. Clytemnestra, the wife of king Agamemnon, cheated on her husband and then killed him upon his return from the Trojan war – placing her in the category of a ‘bad wife.’ Clytemnestra’s demise reflects the consequences of stepping outside the roles assigned to women, one who brought disaster to their husband by their excise of autonomy. Yet Clytemnestra stands in stark opposition to Penelope, the wife of Odysseus. Penelope uses her autonomy to stay within the typical social roles of a good greek wife. Even though Penelope does not act like Clytemnestra, the consequences of Clytemnestra’s action damage the reputation of Penelope and of all women. If Clytemnestra represents the ‘bad wife’ who attempts to destroy the greek patriarchal culture, then Penelope stands as the good wife who upholds it. This paper will analyze how the legacy of Clytemnestra’s social transgression influenced the perception of Penelope in Homer’s Odyssey. In the work Homer draws comparisons between Penelope and Clytemnestra as representation of the opposite spectrums of autonomy in heroic women. This tension over the fear of patriarchal violation between Clytemnestra and Penelope in the Odyssey tells us about the larger fear of autonomous women in early greek society.

7:00 PM

External Keynote Address by Dr. Erika Dyck (USask)

Dr. Erika Dyck

Barber Centre, HOL 190

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Dr. Dyck's research focuses on the history of psychadelics and the possibilities of applying them in the field of medicine. She is a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. For more information about Erika and her research, please visit our website: www.tru.ca/phpconf

9:00 PM

Post-Keynote Social

Social Event

Location TBA

9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

Join us for appetizers and drinks following Dr. Erika Dyck's keynote address. Location is currently unconfirmed, and will be announced on our website and Facebook page closer to the date.