Paper Title

[1.3] Austerity Budgets: Cuts to Female Success

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

Start Date

19-1-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

19-1-2019 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Economic Policy | Economics | International Relations | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In a global economy that has reverted to a neo-liberal system as of late, the forward progress of the Women’s Movement has been stalled in a fight for economic and political equality with their male counterparts in the workforce following the economic downturn of 2008-2009. As a reaction to the market crash of 08-09, many Western states implemented austerity budgets in hopes of rebuilding their national economies; the result was greater inequality between men and women. This paper argues that austerity budgets that cut funding to social services have inherent biases and negative impacts that unreasonably affect women more than men by directly obstructing their access to participate in the upper echelon of the labour market, thereby reinforcing patriarchal hierarchies in a global neo-liberal economy. This paper outlines the foundations of austerity budgets and a succinct history of the economic successes of the Women’s Movement. It then analyzes the current economic situation that women face in the aftermath of austerity budgets and uses the United Kingdom as a case study. This paper concludes that gender equality in the labour market will never be achieved under the current neo-liberal global economic framework and suggests potential policy solutions to increase parity while maintaining global economic growth.

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Jan 19th, 9:00 AM Jan 19th, 10:15 AM

[1.3] Austerity Budgets: Cuts to Female Success

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

In a global economy that has reverted to a neo-liberal system as of late, the forward progress of the Women’s Movement has been stalled in a fight for economic and political equality with their male counterparts in the workforce following the economic downturn of 2008-2009. As a reaction to the market crash of 08-09, many Western states implemented austerity budgets in hopes of rebuilding their national economies; the result was greater inequality between men and women. This paper argues that austerity budgets that cut funding to social services have inherent biases and negative impacts that unreasonably affect women more than men by directly obstructing their access to participate in the upper echelon of the labour market, thereby reinforcing patriarchal hierarchies in a global neo-liberal economy. This paper outlines the foundations of austerity budgets and a succinct history of the economic successes of the Women’s Movement. It then analyzes the current economic situation that women face in the aftermath of austerity budgets and uses the United Kingdom as a case study. This paper concludes that gender equality in the labour market will never be achieved under the current neo-liberal global economic framework and suggests potential policy solutions to increase parity while maintaining global economic growth.