Paper Title

[1.2] Why Anything Could or Could Not be for Sale

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

Start Date

19-1-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

19-1-2019 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Ethics and Political Philosophy | Philosophy | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

One major critique about markets is that they do not support equality amongst individuals in society. From the egalitarian perspective, there are markets that either, depend upon inequalities for their existence, amplify and intensify inequalities through markets in specific goods or services, or create and develop inequality because of their existence. In Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale, Debra Satz examines the relationship between markets and equality. Her book rests in major part on egalitarian political theory. I will compare Marx & Engle’s Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 to question Satz argument that problems of inequality only stem from some specific markets. I will argue that the four parameters that Satz uses to measure noxious markets; weak agency, vulnerability, and extreme harm to individuals and society have the potential to be applicable to any labour market. Marx account of alienation highlights how Satz argument has the potential to be applicable to any market. I will use the model of ‘dials’ from Brennan & Jaworski’s Markets Without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests to shed light on the framework of markets and provide a way in which we can understand how these negative features sometimes exist and other times do not. I hope to resolve some of the tension between whether the negative concerns about labour markets are intrinsic or contingent but I will end with the question of whether or not the dial model resolves the egalitarian concerns about markets.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 19th, 9:00 AM Jan 19th, 10:15 AM

[1.2] Why Anything Could or Could Not be for Sale

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

One major critique about markets is that they do not support equality amongst individuals in society. From the egalitarian perspective, there are markets that either, depend upon inequalities for their existence, amplify and intensify inequalities through markets in specific goods or services, or create and develop inequality because of their existence. In Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale, Debra Satz examines the relationship between markets and equality. Her book rests in major part on egalitarian political theory. I will compare Marx & Engle’s Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 to question Satz argument that problems of inequality only stem from some specific markets. I will argue that the four parameters that Satz uses to measure noxious markets; weak agency, vulnerability, and extreme harm to individuals and society have the potential to be applicable to any labour market. Marx account of alienation highlights how Satz argument has the potential to be applicable to any market. I will use the model of ‘dials’ from Brennan & Jaworski’s Markets Without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests to shed light on the framework of markets and provide a way in which we can understand how these negative features sometimes exist and other times do not. I hope to resolve some of the tension between whether the negative concerns about labour markets are intrinsic or contingent but I will end with the question of whether or not the dial model resolves the egalitarian concerns about markets.