Paper Title

[1.1] Citizen Inc.: Exploring the Social Responsibility of the Corporate Citizen

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

Start Date

19-1-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

19-1-2019 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Business Law, Public Responsibility, and Ethics | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Contemporary economic-relations of domestic and international societies are now thoroughly expressed by the mechanisms of advanced capitalist-production and laissez-faire market exchange. At the center of the relationship between liberalized commodity exchange and private-property lies the corporation: a combine of independent entities dedicated to advancing the efficiency of a given enterprise. Yet due to its peculiar status as both person and company-of-persons, the relationship between corporation and society remains ill-defined. Suspended between legal, political, and psychological schools of thought, the discussion often intersects in contradictory claims regarding the nature of incorporated entities as participants in societal relations. The objective of this paper is therefore to provide a scientific analysis of the modern corporation, illuminate logical inconsistencies in its personhood-status, and consequently, resolving the most appropriate term for approving them as social agencies. The focus will be limited to the corporation as it defines privately incorporated business-entities, capital and other instruments of commercial relations. Comparing the variety of publications on the emerging doctrine of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), including Milton Friedman’s The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profit (1970), is how it intends to determine if the corporate entity possesses personality traits compatible with its legal personhood status; or alternatively, if its behavioral features, as suggested by Friedman, are indeed accurate assessments of the corporate character. In conclusion, the proposition is made that the doctrine of CSR fails to reverse both the inherent mechanical laws of business and the psychological predisposition of corporate persons toward profit maximization.

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Jan 19th, 9:00 AM Jan 19th, 10:15 AM

[1.1] Citizen Inc.: Exploring the Social Responsibility of the Corporate Citizen

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Jeff McLaughlin

Contemporary economic-relations of domestic and international societies are now thoroughly expressed by the mechanisms of advanced capitalist-production and laissez-faire market exchange. At the center of the relationship between liberalized commodity exchange and private-property lies the corporation: a combine of independent entities dedicated to advancing the efficiency of a given enterprise. Yet due to its peculiar status as both person and company-of-persons, the relationship between corporation and society remains ill-defined. Suspended between legal, political, and psychological schools of thought, the discussion often intersects in contradictory claims regarding the nature of incorporated entities as participants in societal relations. The objective of this paper is therefore to provide a scientific analysis of the modern corporation, illuminate logical inconsistencies in its personhood-status, and consequently, resolving the most appropriate term for approving them as social agencies. The focus will be limited to the corporation as it defines privately incorporated business-entities, capital and other instruments of commercial relations. Comparing the variety of publications on the emerging doctrine of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), including Milton Friedman’s The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profit (1970), is how it intends to determine if the corporate entity possesses personality traits compatible with its legal personhood status; or alternatively, if its behavioral features, as suggested by Friedman, are indeed accurate assessments of the corporate character. In conclusion, the proposition is made that the doctrine of CSR fails to reverse both the inherent mechanical laws of business and the psychological predisposition of corporate persons toward profit maximization.