Paper Title

[1.3] Pragmatism and the Fact/Value Distinction

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Carrie Jenkins

Start Date

19-1-2019 2:30 PM

End Date

19-1-2019 3:45 PM

Disciplines

Other Philosophy | Theory and Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Physicalist and scientific realist assumptions are built into the way that much of modern philosophy describes the world. David Hume most famously formulated the is/ought problem, establishing a strict separation between the domain of what is and the domain of what ought to be. The American pragmatists, especially John Dewey and William James, saw things quite differently. An organism does not experience the world-as-it-is as either separate or separable from the question of how that organism should act in the world. The fact/value distinction is perhaps conceptually useful, but metaphysically suspect. I build upon the framework established by Dewey in his landmark 1896 article The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology to describe the world as first and foremost a place in which organisms must act.

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Jan 19th, 2:30 PM Jan 19th, 3:45 PM

[1.3] Pragmatism and the Fact/Value Distinction

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Carrie Jenkins

Physicalist and scientific realist assumptions are built into the way that much of modern philosophy describes the world. David Hume most famously formulated the is/ought problem, establishing a strict separation between the domain of what is and the domain of what ought to be. The American pragmatists, especially John Dewey and William James, saw things quite differently. An organism does not experience the world-as-it-is as either separate or separable from the question of how that organism should act in the world. The fact/value distinction is perhaps conceptually useful, but metaphysically suspect. I build upon the framework established by Dewey in his landmark 1896 article The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology to describe the world as first and foremost a place in which organisms must act.