Paper Title

[1.1] Identity and Morality in Virtual Spaces

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Carrie Jenkins

Start Date

19-1-2019 2:30 PM

End Date

19-1-2019 3:45 PM

Disciplines

Applied Ethics | Graphics and Human Computer Interfaces | Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In Shelley Turkle's 1996 article, "Who am We",she provides an account of how virtual identitiesserve as compartmentalizations of the "real" self.This paper provides an argument for how this de-centering ofidentity can harm the player whoinhabits the avatar in a virtual space. In the firstsection I establish the unique metaphysics ofvirtual environments and how identity bonds areforged through action. By utilizing concepts fromPlato and Aristotle, I argue that the player isdeceived of their own values through the act ofimmersive gameplay and grows to value thesuccess and achievements of the avatar ratherthan their own. In the latter section of the paperI argue that this form of escapism can be used ina productive way as a form of simulatedcognitive behavioural therapy if the playerapproaches the act of gameplay as anopportunity for practicing social behaviours theywould like to exhibit in their "real" lives.

Comments

I have a paper and a presentation ready to go but I am hoping to further research and develop these concept if the paper is accepted.

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Jan 19th, 2:30 PM Jan 19th, 3:45 PM

[1.1] Identity and Morality in Virtual Spaces

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Carrie Jenkins

In Shelley Turkle's 1996 article, "Who am We",she provides an account of how virtual identitiesserve as compartmentalizations of the "real" self.This paper provides an argument for how this de-centering ofidentity can harm the player whoinhabits the avatar in a virtual space. In the firstsection I establish the unique metaphysics ofvirtual environments and how identity bonds areforged through action. By utilizing concepts fromPlato and Aristotle, I argue that the player isdeceived of their own values through the act ofimmersive gameplay and grows to value thesuccess and achievements of the avatar ratherthan their own. In the latter section of the paperI argue that this form of escapism can be used ina productive way as a form of simulatedcognitive behavioural therapy if the playerapproaches the act of gameplay as anopportunity for practicing social behaviours theywould like to exhibit in their "real" lives.