Paper Title

[2.1] A Current and On-Going Affair: An Analysis and Critical History on the Effects of Residential Schools on the Indigenous Peoples of Canada

Location

International Building 1014, Moderated by Annie St. John-Stark

Start Date

19-1-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

19-1-2019 2:15 PM

Disciplines

Canadian History | History

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The last residential school in Canada closed in June of 1996, but yet, the history of residential schools here in Canada is constantly framed as an occurrence of the past. This post-modernist view has commonly shaped the perspective in which many Indigenous issues in Canada are approached. This unfortunate reality makes it necessary to bring to light the very recent and detrimental effects that residential schools have had on the Indigenous population of Canada. This paper is an attempt to do exactly this. Within this paper I analyze the intentions of residential schools along with their goals, internal conditions, and various first-hand experiences of survivors. This analysis, in combination with various academic studies and other research, will demonstrate how the experience of residential schools has had and continues to have immediate, on-going, and intergenerational effects on the Indigenous population of Canada. Lastly, it is recognized that implementing residential schools has had the opposite affect than it intended. This institution was supposed to help the Indigenous population assimilate into the new Canadian society, but instead of doing so, the outcome was and still is cultural genocide. This has not only led to the loss of Indigenous heritage, culture, and language, but has most severely caused the permanent disadvantaging of Indigenous peoples in a multitude of ways. The above findings of this paper determine that the history of residential schools in Canada requires more action, investigation, and research in order to assert this as an event that fully affects the Indigenous population in the past, present, and future tense. Key Words: Indigenous, Residential School, Trauma, Consequences, Colonialism, Disadvantaged, Canada, Loss, Genocide, Generational

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Jan 19th, 1:00 PM Jan 19th, 2:15 PM

[2.1] A Current and On-Going Affair: An Analysis and Critical History on the Effects of Residential Schools on the Indigenous Peoples of Canada

International Building 1014, Moderated by Annie St. John-Stark

The last residential school in Canada closed in June of 1996, but yet, the history of residential schools here in Canada is constantly framed as an occurrence of the past. This post-modernist view has commonly shaped the perspective in which many Indigenous issues in Canada are approached. This unfortunate reality makes it necessary to bring to light the very recent and detrimental effects that residential schools have had on the Indigenous population of Canada. This paper is an attempt to do exactly this. Within this paper I analyze the intentions of residential schools along with their goals, internal conditions, and various first-hand experiences of survivors. This analysis, in combination with various academic studies and other research, will demonstrate how the experience of residential schools has had and continues to have immediate, on-going, and intergenerational effects on the Indigenous population of Canada. Lastly, it is recognized that implementing residential schools has had the opposite affect than it intended. This institution was supposed to help the Indigenous population assimilate into the new Canadian society, but instead of doing so, the outcome was and still is cultural genocide. This has not only led to the loss of Indigenous heritage, culture, and language, but has most severely caused the permanent disadvantaging of Indigenous peoples in a multitude of ways. The above findings of this paper determine that the history of residential schools in Canada requires more action, investigation, and research in order to assert this as an event that fully affects the Indigenous population in the past, present, and future tense. Key Words: Indigenous, Residential School, Trauma, Consequences, Colonialism, Disadvantaged, Canada, Loss, Genocide, Generational