Paper Title

[1.3] The Meaning in Life

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Chris Goto-Jones

Start Date

19-1-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

19-1-2019 2:15 PM

Disciplines

Continental Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Albert Camus describes the absurd as something that arises inevitably from the relationship of homo sapiens, the thinking man, to the world, and our awareness of this relationship: we have a powerful self-preservation instinct, and it is in our nature to seek the meaning of things, yet we are all condemned to death, and the world resists our efforts to find transcendent meaning that would unify and redeem existence. My thesis is that life can be worth living. In this paper I examine, in turn: the nature of the absurd; Terror Management Theory as an explanation for how societies historically dealt with the absurd; the unwinding of this and the birth of existentialism in the wake of what Friedrich Nietzsche called the Death of God; and contemporary attempts to address this seemingly insoluble problem, including those of Nietzsche, Camus and Jordan Peterson.

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Jan 19th, 1:00 PM Jan 19th, 2:15 PM

[1.3] The Meaning in Life

International Building 1010, Moderated by Chris Goto-Jones

Albert Camus describes the absurd as something that arises inevitably from the relationship of homo sapiens, the thinking man, to the world, and our awareness of this relationship: we have a powerful self-preservation instinct, and it is in our nature to seek the meaning of things, yet we are all condemned to death, and the world resists our efforts to find transcendent meaning that would unify and redeem existence. My thesis is that life can be worth living. In this paper I examine, in turn: the nature of the absurd; Terror Management Theory as an explanation for how societies historically dealt with the absurd; the unwinding of this and the birth of existentialism in the wake of what Friedrich Nietzsche called the Death of God; and contemporary attempts to address this seemingly insoluble problem, including those of Nietzsche, Camus and Jordan Peterson.