Paper Title

[1.1] Does Life Have no Meaning?: A Critique of Absurdity and Metaphysical Rebellion

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Chris Goto-Jones

Start Date

19-1-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

19-1-2019 2:15 PM

Disciplines

Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper critiques Albert Camus’ major arguments for why life is meaningless and why metaphysical rebellion is the only appropriate response to the inescapable reality of death. Camus’ arguments have led many to believe, today, that life, ultimately, has no transcendent meaning other than that which we, as humans, give to it. The reason his arguments are especially influential is that they allow us to live solely with what we can know for certain without needing to make, what Camus calls, a leap into the unknown by believing in any kind of God. In his arguments, though, Camus actually makes several leaps of his own, meaning his arguments are not as grounded in human limitations as they appear. This paper will begin with a brief overview of Camus’ argument for why life has no meaning and why metaphysical rebellion is the only appropriate response to this reality, followed by a critique of the presuppositions Camus makes in order to support these arguments. Specifically, this paper will highlight Camus’ assumption that for any meaning in the universe to be useful to us, it must correspond to our human condition and that we can still have the idea of justice without an objective standard. The hope is that this paper will inform readers about the true nature of Camus’ arguments and show that it does not completely negate the possibility that life may still have a meaning that is both relevant and useful to us. Keywords: the absurd, revolt, God, metaphysical rebellion

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 19th, 1:00 PM Jan 19th, 2:15 PM

[1.1] Does Life Have no Meaning?: A Critique of Absurdity and Metaphysical Rebellion

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Chris Goto-Jones

This paper critiques Albert Camus’ major arguments for why life is meaningless and why metaphysical rebellion is the only appropriate response to the inescapable reality of death. Camus’ arguments have led many to believe, today, that life, ultimately, has no transcendent meaning other than that which we, as humans, give to it. The reason his arguments are especially influential is that they allow us to live solely with what we can know for certain without needing to make, what Camus calls, a leap into the unknown by believing in any kind of God. In his arguments, though, Camus actually makes several leaps of his own, meaning his arguments are not as grounded in human limitations as they appear. This paper will begin with a brief overview of Camus’ argument for why life has no meaning and why metaphysical rebellion is the only appropriate response to this reality, followed by a critique of the presuppositions Camus makes in order to support these arguments. Specifically, this paper will highlight Camus’ assumption that for any meaning in the universe to be useful to us, it must correspond to our human condition and that we can still have the idea of justice without an objective standard. The hope is that this paper will inform readers about the true nature of Camus’ arguments and show that it does not completely negate the possibility that life may still have a meaning that is both relevant and useful to us. Keywords: the absurd, revolt, God, metaphysical rebellion