Paper Title

[1.2] United in Opposition: The Relationship Between Journalism and Activism in Hong Kong

Location

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Michael Gorman

Start Date

19-1-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

19-1-2019 11:45 AM

Disciplines

Asian History | Chinese Studies | Political History | Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper explores the long, close relationship between journalism and activism in the former British colony and current Chinese Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong and posits that this close relationship stems from a lack of directly accountable leadership and the subsequent need for someone to “express their voices and opinions and to act as a check on the authorities” (Wu, 2018, p.12). Specifically, it uses the examples of several 20th and 21st century activist movements which had close, symbiotic ties to media, whether corporate or more grassroots and citizen-based, to make the point that journalism and activism often work in tandem. It also raises concern over the continued freedom of Hong Kong’s press in the face of both government and self-censorship, and suggests that journalism and activism will likely end up even more closely intertwined in the event of future chilling effects. Finally, it proposes further research into journalist and activist perspectives on the relationship between their disciplines in order to see how the blurring of lines in the new media era may change how they exist and interact in a space considered to be increasingly threatened.

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Jan 19th, 10:30 AM Jan 19th, 11:45 AM

[1.2] United in Opposition: The Relationship Between Journalism and Activism in Hong Kong

International Building 1010, Moderated by Dr. Michael Gorman

This paper explores the long, close relationship between journalism and activism in the former British colony and current Chinese Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong and posits that this close relationship stems from a lack of directly accountable leadership and the subsequent need for someone to “express their voices and opinions and to act as a check on the authorities” (Wu, 2018, p.12). Specifically, it uses the examples of several 20th and 21st century activist movements which had close, symbiotic ties to media, whether corporate or more grassroots and citizen-based, to make the point that journalism and activism often work in tandem. It also raises concern over the continued freedom of Hong Kong’s press in the face of both government and self-censorship, and suggests that journalism and activism will likely end up even more closely intertwined in the event of future chilling effects. Finally, it proposes further research into journalist and activist perspectives on the relationship between their disciplines in order to see how the blurring of lines in the new media era may change how they exist and interact in a space considered to be increasingly threatened.