Paper Title

[3.3] Kant and Foucault: The Architectonic Bridge

Location

Old Main 1761, Moderated by Tim Fitzjohn

Start Date

18-1-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

18-1-2019 3:15 PM

Disciplines

Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

What is reason, and what does it mean for us to come ‘to know’ something? To shed light on the nature of (scientific) knowledge, and the acquisition of such, I will examine the notion of pure reason as developed in Kant’s First Critique. In this conception of a pure science, reason culminates in the ‘architectonic’ whereby pure reason itself—as an “art of systems” (A832/B860)—strives to achieve unity between the subject’s knowledge and the factical, empirical state of the phenomenal world. To show this, I will elucidate the Kantian paradigm by surveying some major aspects of reason derived in the Critique of Pure Reason: namely, the regulative role of reason and its transcendental principles; the unity of the subject’s cognition; and, the pursuit for empirical knowledge of the world—where the necessary connections which constitute the unity of cognition are brought into a harmony with “the whole of knowledge” (B674). Subsequently, I will provide an analysis of Kant’s position through the lens of Michel Foucault’s critical genealogy. Insofar as he takes scientific knowledge and practice to constitute a mere apparatus of disciplinary mechanisms, I will illustrate Foucault’s method as it relates to scientific knowledge and expertise derived via the emergent architectonic processes of the human sciences. Finally, I will assess the impact and success of Foucault’s criticism to, perchance, enhance our understanding of reason’s place in contemporary society. In this way, I will elaborate the individual’s relation to the normative and hierarchical (scientific) apparatuses that generate these disciplinary functions.

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Jan 18th, 2:00 PM Jan 18th, 3:15 PM

[3.3] Kant and Foucault: The Architectonic Bridge

Old Main 1761, Moderated by Tim Fitzjohn

What is reason, and what does it mean for us to come ‘to know’ something? To shed light on the nature of (scientific) knowledge, and the acquisition of such, I will examine the notion of pure reason as developed in Kant’s First Critique. In this conception of a pure science, reason culminates in the ‘architectonic’ whereby pure reason itself—as an “art of systems” (A832/B860)—strives to achieve unity between the subject’s knowledge and the factical, empirical state of the phenomenal world. To show this, I will elucidate the Kantian paradigm by surveying some major aspects of reason derived in the Critique of Pure Reason: namely, the regulative role of reason and its transcendental principles; the unity of the subject’s cognition; and, the pursuit for empirical knowledge of the world—where the necessary connections which constitute the unity of cognition are brought into a harmony with “the whole of knowledge” (B674). Subsequently, I will provide an analysis of Kant’s position through the lens of Michel Foucault’s critical genealogy. Insofar as he takes scientific knowledge and practice to constitute a mere apparatus of disciplinary mechanisms, I will illustrate Foucault’s method as it relates to scientific knowledge and expertise derived via the emergent architectonic processes of the human sciences. Finally, I will assess the impact and success of Foucault’s criticism to, perchance, enhance our understanding of reason’s place in contemporary society. In this way, I will elaborate the individual’s relation to the normative and hierarchical (scientific) apparatuses that generate these disciplinary functions.