Paper Title

[2.1] The Demise of Çadır Höyük: Rural Agrarian Settlement and Economy in Eleventh-Century Byzantine Anatolia.

Location

Arts & Education 162, Moderated by Dr. Tina Block

Start Date

18-1-2019 5:00 PM

End Date

18-1-2019 6:15 PM

Disciplines

Byzantine and Modern Greek | Classical Literature and Philology | History | Islamic World and Near East History | Medieval History | Medieval Studies | Military History | Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology | Social History

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Çadır Höyük, a rural agrarian settlement on the eastern Anatolian plateau, is the focus of this paper. I propose a new narrative for the late eleventh-century destruction event of Çadır Höyük by utilizing the recovered numismatic evidence from the site’s destruction layers. The paper utilizes the numismatic evidence outside the traditional scholarly methods that have isolated coins from their depositional contexts, and I provide a more integrated method for their use at Çadır Höyük in order to show that the targeted destruction of Çadır Höyük in the eleventh century was due to its function as a dromos (military public-post). I propose that hired German mercenaries, the Nemitzoi, who rebelled from Romanus IV’s army in 1071 were responsible for the settlement’s destruction. My arguments examine both the larger imperial narrative concerning the local, regional economy and function of rural-agrarian Anatolia. I discuss interactions between peasants, military units and the Byzantine elite and I suggest an alternative function for the settlement at Çadır Höyük in the Middle Byzantine period as a dromos rather than a fortified agrarian settlement.

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Jan 18th, 5:00 PM Jan 18th, 6:15 PM

[2.1] The Demise of Çadır Höyük: Rural Agrarian Settlement and Economy in Eleventh-Century Byzantine Anatolia.

Arts & Education 162, Moderated by Dr. Tina Block

Çadır Höyük, a rural agrarian settlement on the eastern Anatolian plateau, is the focus of this paper. I propose a new narrative for the late eleventh-century destruction event of Çadır Höyük by utilizing the recovered numismatic evidence from the site’s destruction layers. The paper utilizes the numismatic evidence outside the traditional scholarly methods that have isolated coins from their depositional contexts, and I provide a more integrated method for their use at Çadır Höyük in order to show that the targeted destruction of Çadır Höyük in the eleventh century was due to its function as a dromos (military public-post). I propose that hired German mercenaries, the Nemitzoi, who rebelled from Romanus IV’s army in 1071 were responsible for the settlement’s destruction. My arguments examine both the larger imperial narrative concerning the local, regional economy and function of rural-agrarian Anatolia. I discuss interactions between peasants, military units and the Byzantine elite and I suggest an alternative function for the settlement at Çadır Höyük in the Middle Byzantine period as a dromos rather than a fortified agrarian settlement.