Paper Title

[3.2] The Honesty of Meursault's Silence

Location

Arts & Education Building 208, Moderated by Dr. Bruce Baugh

Start Date

18-1-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

18-1-2019 4:45 PM

Disciplines

Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Silence is a form of detachment from the world for Camus' character Meursault, but also a form of honesty. The protagonist from The Outsider speaks only when necessary. Camus contrasts this in The Myth of Sisyphus with the silence of the universe in response to the human questions of purpose and meaning. This is the basis of Camus' idea of the absurd. Human beings have a desire for meaning to their place in the world and the answer of the universe is silence. When people are woken up to this absurdity their only choice, Camus says, is to respond honestly by keeping both of these parts of the absurd alive. There must be a simple "no" to the injustice of the absurd, but a clear "yes" to living in the world and defying that injustice. To live honestly in the world means holding on to both the awareness of the injustice of human life and choosing to rebel against that injustice. Meursault embodies this honesty in his conservative speech, but also in his defiance of belief in another life.

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Jan 18th, 3:30 PM Jan 18th, 4:45 PM

[3.2] The Honesty of Meursault's Silence

Arts & Education Building 208, Moderated by Dr. Bruce Baugh

Silence is a form of detachment from the world for Camus' character Meursault, but also a form of honesty. The protagonist from The Outsider speaks only when necessary. Camus contrasts this in The Myth of Sisyphus with the silence of the universe in response to the human questions of purpose and meaning. This is the basis of Camus' idea of the absurd. Human beings have a desire for meaning to their place in the world and the answer of the universe is silence. When people are woken up to this absurdity their only choice, Camus says, is to respond honestly by keeping both of these parts of the absurd alive. There must be a simple "no" to the injustice of the absurd, but a clear "yes" to living in the world and defying that injustice. To live honestly in the world means holding on to both the awareness of the injustice of human life and choosing to rebel against that injustice. Meursault embodies this honesty in his conservative speech, but also in his defiance of belief in another life.