Paper Title

[1.3] Human Rights: Implications of a Right to Citizenship

Location

Arts & Education Building 260, Moderated by Dr. Robert Hanlon

Start Date

18-1-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

18-1-2019 4:45 PM

Disciplines

Philosophy

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper addresses contemporary discussions surrounding human rights. It will argue that any conception of human rights must be understood as being practically couched in terms of citizenship. This essay begins by examining two competing understandings of human rights, proposed by James Griffin and Joseph Raz. It then examines Selya Benhabibs’ construct of “democratic iterations,” and observes how this concept interacts with varying conceptions of human rights. The essay goes on to propose that, regardless of the adopted conception of human rights, the state is an enabling necessity in both the existence and exercise of those rights. It then considers the problem of contemporary statelessness. Finally, it explores what obligations can be drawn from this conception of states as guarantors of human rights.

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Jan 18th, 3:30 PM Jan 18th, 4:45 PM

[1.3] Human Rights: Implications of a Right to Citizenship

Arts & Education Building 260, Moderated by Dr. Robert Hanlon

This paper addresses contemporary discussions surrounding human rights. It will argue that any conception of human rights must be understood as being practically couched in terms of citizenship. This essay begins by examining two competing understandings of human rights, proposed by James Griffin and Joseph Raz. It then examines Selya Benhabibs’ construct of “democratic iterations,” and observes how this concept interacts with varying conceptions of human rights. The essay goes on to propose that, regardless of the adopted conception of human rights, the state is an enabling necessity in both the existence and exercise of those rights. It then considers the problem of contemporary statelessness. Finally, it explores what obligations can be drawn from this conception of states as guarantors of human rights.