Paper Title

[1.2] Comparing Counter-Terrorism in the United States, Canada and Israel

Location

Arts & Education Building 260, Moderated by Dr. Robert Hanlon

Start Date

18-1-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

18-1-2019 4:45 PM

Disciplines

Political Science

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

In recent years, states around the world have adopted new counter-terrorism strategies to address major security risks to their citizens. Coming largely in response to 9/11, these increased security measures leads to questions regarding the extent of the role the state plays in counter-terrorism. The extent of the state’s power is particularly interesting to examine in liberal democracies where balancing citizen’s rights and privacy with the overall security of the state is a major issue in determining the depth of counter-terrorism. This essay will compare three state’s counter-terrorism strategies: Israel, the United States and Canada. Each of these states has its own unique counter-terrorism strategy that continue to evolve as threats change. Israel has adopted an incredibly active and invasive counter-terrorism strategy, largely due to its long history of frequent terrorist attacks and the aggressiveness of its neighbouring states towards its existence. The United States underwent a major transformation post-9/11, with counter-terrorism moving from a small part of the nation’s overall security to being now a major component of their national security. Canada also changed substantially post-9/11, however it did not change as drastically as the United States, is further complicated by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and in the years since 9/11 has been moving to a less invasive counter-terrorism approach.

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Jan 18th, 3:30 PM Jan 18th, 4:45 PM

[1.2] Comparing Counter-Terrorism in the United States, Canada and Israel

Arts & Education Building 260, Moderated by Dr. Robert Hanlon

In recent years, states around the world have adopted new counter-terrorism strategies to address major security risks to their citizens. Coming largely in response to 9/11, these increased security measures leads to questions regarding the extent of the role the state plays in counter-terrorism. The extent of the state’s power is particularly interesting to examine in liberal democracies where balancing citizen’s rights and privacy with the overall security of the state is a major issue in determining the depth of counter-terrorism. This essay will compare three state’s counter-terrorism strategies: Israel, the United States and Canada. Each of these states has its own unique counter-terrorism strategy that continue to evolve as threats change. Israel has adopted an incredibly active and invasive counter-terrorism strategy, largely due to its long history of frequent terrorist attacks and the aggressiveness of its neighbouring states towards its existence. The United States underwent a major transformation post-9/11, with counter-terrorism moving from a small part of the nation’s overall security to being now a major component of their national security. Canada also changed substantially post-9/11, however it did not change as drastically as the United States, is further complicated by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and in the years since 9/11 has been moving to a less invasive counter-terrorism approach.