Proposal Title

SESSION 2.3: Agricultural Diversity in BC’s Thompson and Cariboo Regions

Presentation Type

Individual paper

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

4-5-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

4-5-2019 12:15 PM

Disciplines

Human Geography

Abstract

Agriculture in the southern interior of BC has always involved some diversity in terms of the variety of crops grown, the combination of livestock raised, agri-tourism activities, and non-farm employment. However, the impact of the Mad Cow disease crisis of 2003 and climate change has reaffirmed the importance of agricultural diversity. The purpose of this presentation is to give an overview of agriculture in the Thompson and Cariboo regions and highlight some of the diversified farm operations and future trends. The Thompson region is general warmer and drier than the Cariboo and has a larger urban centre – Kamloops. We compare the two regions based on exploratory interviews with farm and ranch operators, regional planners, and an agrologist. Our preliminary results are that farmers are open to experimenting with new crops or activities. Second, agri-tourism is growing, particularly in the Kamloops area where four wineries exist. Third, most producers depend on farmers’ markets or direct marketing, even in the Lower Mainland. Meanwhile, some family farms are being corporatized and consolidated, which can help a farm, for example, to become certified organic. The principal conclusion is that while diversification – particularly, agri-tourism -- is one way that operations are surviving or prospering, other farms are being bought up and consolidated.

Comments

Tom Waldichuk (presenter), Dept. of Geography & Environmental Studies, Thompson Rivers U., Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8 twaldichuk@tru.ca;

Toshio Kikuchi, Graduate School of Urban Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan U., Tokyo 192-0397, Japan, kikuchan@tmu.ac.jp;

Akira Tabayashi, Geoenvironmental Sciences (Human Geography), U. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577, Japan akira@geoenv.tsukuba.ac.jp;

Takaaki Nihei, Graduate School of Letters, Hokkaido U., Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 Japan nihei@let.hokudai.ac.jp

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 4th, 10:45 AM May 4th, 12:15 PM

SESSION 2.3: Agricultural Diversity in BC’s Thompson and Cariboo Regions

IB 1010

Agriculture in the southern interior of BC has always involved some diversity in terms of the variety of crops grown, the combination of livestock raised, agri-tourism activities, and non-farm employment. However, the impact of the Mad Cow disease crisis of 2003 and climate change has reaffirmed the importance of agricultural diversity. The purpose of this presentation is to give an overview of agriculture in the Thompson and Cariboo regions and highlight some of the diversified farm operations and future trends. The Thompson region is general warmer and drier than the Cariboo and has a larger urban centre – Kamloops. We compare the two regions based on exploratory interviews with farm and ranch operators, regional planners, and an agrologist. Our preliminary results are that farmers are open to experimenting with new crops or activities. Second, agri-tourism is growing, particularly in the Kamloops area where four wineries exist. Third, most producers depend on farmers’ markets or direct marketing, even in the Lower Mainland. Meanwhile, some family farms are being corporatized and consolidated, which can help a farm, for example, to become certified organic. The principal conclusion is that while diversification – particularly, agri-tourism -- is one way that operations are surviving or prospering, other farms are being bought up and consolidated.