Proposal Title

SESSION 2.1: A Storied Landscape: Deconstructing Colonial Narratives at Milner Gardens

Presentation Type

Individual paper

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

4-5-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

4-5-2019 3:45 PM

Abstract

This place-based research has been part of a 2.5 year project at Milner Gardens in Qualicum Beach, BC that has included an archaeological inventory, literature analysis, interviews, and an interactive, digital mapping project. Sources used within this research include personal interviews, online surveys, archival research, and government-held archaeological reports in the hopes of providing a comprehensive of the stories and information held in and about the landscape. The purpose of this project has been threefold: to explore the role of counter-narratives in reconciliation; the ideas of "nature" or "wilderness" in the Western understanding of landscapes; and the role of archaeology in progressing or holding back knowledge transfers related to place and relationships. By examining these ideas, one can examine the impacts of colonial ideas of landscape and how and why certain stories are marginalized. This is important to identify if we are to be able to move forward in conscientious ways towards reconciliation

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May 4th, 2:15 PM May 4th, 3:45 PM

SESSION 2.1: A Storied Landscape: Deconstructing Colonial Narratives at Milner Gardens

IB 1010

This place-based research has been part of a 2.5 year project at Milner Gardens in Qualicum Beach, BC that has included an archaeological inventory, literature analysis, interviews, and an interactive, digital mapping project. Sources used within this research include personal interviews, online surveys, archival research, and government-held archaeological reports in the hopes of providing a comprehensive of the stories and information held in and about the landscape. The purpose of this project has been threefold: to explore the role of counter-narratives in reconciliation; the ideas of "nature" or "wilderness" in the Western understanding of landscapes; and the role of archaeology in progressing or holding back knowledge transfers related to place and relationships. By examining these ideas, one can examine the impacts of colonial ideas of landscape and how and why certain stories are marginalized. This is important to identify if we are to be able to move forward in conscientious ways towards reconciliation