SESSION 3 [Panel]: Dam High Modernism in British Columbia: The Rhetoric of High Modernism and the Two Rivers Policy

Frank Leonard, University of Victoria
Takaia Larsen, Selkirk College
Daniel Sims, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus

Abstract

In Seeing Like a State, James C. Scott placed the concept of high modernism, an ideology that aimed to remake the physical world along claimed scientific and technological lines, at the centre of a series of disastrous megaprojects in the twentieth century. In the case of British Columbia, scholars have debated his insights in accounts of development, particularly in the province's hinterland. These three papers extend the investigation of high modernism's influence, or lack thereof, on hydro megaprojects during the 1950s and 1960s. Frank Leonard challenges the application of high modernism to explain the activities of the company that initiated the Peace River project. Takaia Larsen maintains that high modernism provides a conceptual framework for examining the Columbia River Project. Daniel Sims asserts that high modernism was employed in the Peace River project to mask an older colonial project.

 
May 3rd, 9:00 AM May 3rd, 10:30 AM

SESSION 3 [Panel]: Dam High Modernism in British Columbia: The Rhetoric of High Modernism and the Two Rivers Policy

IB 1010

In Seeing Like a State, James C. Scott placed the concept of high modernism, an ideology that aimed to remake the physical world along claimed scientific and technological lines, at the centre of a series of disastrous megaprojects in the twentieth century. In the case of British Columbia, scholars have debated his insights in accounts of development, particularly in the province's hinterland. These three papers extend the investigation of high modernism's influence, or lack thereof, on hydro megaprojects during the 1950s and 1960s. Frank Leonard challenges the application of high modernism to explain the activities of the company that initiated the Peace River project. Takaia Larsen maintains that high modernism provides a conceptual framework for examining the Columbia River Project. Daniel Sims asserts that high modernism was employed in the Peace River project to mask an older colonial project.