Proposal Title

SESSION 2.2: "No Indians Allowed": Challenging Racial Aboriginal Segregation in Post-World War II Northern British Columbia

Presentation Type

Individual paper

Location

IB 1010

Start Date

3-5-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

3-5-2019 12:15 PM

Disciplines

Canadian History

Abstract

My presentation, based upon my nearly completed master’s thesis, will investigate how indigenous and non-indigenous activists challenged the race-based policies of segregation and exclusion present in regional businesses throughout post-World War II northern British Columbia. Specifically, this presentation will consider how these communities and activists employed the rhetoric of equality and citizenship to resist racial segregation; as well as how this discourse was articulated – and debated – in the public sphere in the region between Prince George to Prince Rupert during the period between 1945 to 1969. This presentation will also explore how activists framed their protests by drawing analogies between local incidents of racial discrimination and resistance to global theatres of racial conflict such as the Civil Rights movement emerging in the American South to garner public support. Finally, this presentation will analyze the extent in which regional newspapers actively shaped the rhetorical landscape in which this discourse surrounding racial discrimination, Aboriginal citizenship, and native activism were debated. My goal with this thesis, and this presentation, is to contribute to the growing, but small, literature on Aboriginal-white relations in northern British Columbia. This presentation also endeavours to challenge some assumptions regarding Aboriginal activism in this region by demonstrating that indigenous and non-indigenous commentators drew inspiration from international theatres of racial conflict to frame discourse surrounding local racial discrimination. Similarly, this project will help demonstrate that this region was, and continues to be, shaped and give shape to the global historical developments.

Comments

Please let me know if I have missed anything with my application as I would be more than happy to clarify or to expand upon anything I included in it!

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May 3rd, 10:45 AM May 3rd, 12:15 PM

SESSION 2.2: "No Indians Allowed": Challenging Racial Aboriginal Segregation in Post-World War II Northern British Columbia

IB 1010

My presentation, based upon my nearly completed master’s thesis, will investigate how indigenous and non-indigenous activists challenged the race-based policies of segregation and exclusion present in regional businesses throughout post-World War II northern British Columbia. Specifically, this presentation will consider how these communities and activists employed the rhetoric of equality and citizenship to resist racial segregation; as well as how this discourse was articulated – and debated – in the public sphere in the region between Prince George to Prince Rupert during the period between 1945 to 1969. This presentation will also explore how activists framed their protests by drawing analogies between local incidents of racial discrimination and resistance to global theatres of racial conflict such as the Civil Rights movement emerging in the American South to garner public support. Finally, this presentation will analyze the extent in which regional newspapers actively shaped the rhetorical landscape in which this discourse surrounding racial discrimination, Aboriginal citizenship, and native activism were debated. My goal with this thesis, and this presentation, is to contribute to the growing, but small, literature on Aboriginal-white relations in northern British Columbia. This presentation also endeavours to challenge some assumptions regarding Aboriginal activism in this region by demonstrating that indigenous and non-indigenous commentators drew inspiration from international theatres of racial conflict to frame discourse surrounding local racial discrimination. Similarly, this project will help demonstrate that this region was, and continues to be, shaped and give shape to the global historical developments.