SESSION 1 [Panel]: Injustice in the Everyday

Eryk Martin, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Nicole Yakashiro
Laura Mitsuyo Ishiguro, University of British Columbia
Meghan Elizabeth Longstaffe
Angela Kruger

Abstract

While scholarly studies of injustice often focus on explicit expressions of and direct responses to discrimination, this panel begins from the premise that people also understand, experience, and respond to injustice in less obvious, narrow, or immediate – but nonetheless significant – ways. Taking up this point, its papers investigate the daffodil as an everyday technology of settler colonialism (Yakashiro), Nikkei youth, letter-writing, and emotions during the Second World War (Ishiguro), gender and housing precarity in the 1970s (Longstaffe), and Single Room Occupancy hotels as sites of active survival today (Kruger). Individually and together, these papers interrogate the meanings of injustice as it has been conceived and lived in the everyday in British Columbia, and the forms of survival and resilience with which people have responded. By reorienting our attention towards the emotional, material, and discursive everyday, the panel offers new ways of understanding injustice in British Columbia, both past and present.

 
May 2nd, 1:45 PM May 2nd, 3:15 PM

SESSION 1 [Panel]: Injustice in the Everyday

IB 1015

While scholarly studies of injustice often focus on explicit expressions of and direct responses to discrimination, this panel begins from the premise that people also understand, experience, and respond to injustice in less obvious, narrow, or immediate – but nonetheless significant – ways. Taking up this point, its papers investigate the daffodil as an everyday technology of settler colonialism (Yakashiro), Nikkei youth, letter-writing, and emotions during the Second World War (Ishiguro), gender and housing precarity in the 1970s (Longstaffe), and Single Room Occupancy hotels as sites of active survival today (Kruger). Individually and together, these papers interrogate the meanings of injustice as it has been conceived and lived in the everyday in British Columbia, and the forms of survival and resilience with which people have responded. By reorienting our attention towards the emotional, material, and discursive everyday, the panel offers new ways of understanding injustice in British Columbia, both past and present.