SESSION 2 [Panel]: Remaking and Remembering British Columbia

Madeline Knickerbocker, Simon Fraser University
Chantal Norrgard, University of British Columbia
Emma Battell Lowman, University of Hertfordshire

Abstract

In this panel, three scholars actively working in the field of British Columbia history come together to consider entangled projects of history and memory making in the province. Central to this panel are concerns about engagement with historical sources, the construction of historical memory, and the role of history in the present – particularly in relation to the complex histories and the identities they inform(ed) in what is currently British Columbia. The papers by Dr Madeline Knickerbocker, Dr Chantal Norrgard, and Dr Emma Battell Lowman are united in their shared emphasis on historical research and narrative in BC, the nuances and dynamics of historical relationships between Indigenous and Settler people, religious organizations, and labour groups, and in their mutual prioritization of ethical and decolonizing scholarly practice as informed by Indigenous scholars, community members, and research.

 
May 2nd, 3:30 PM May 2nd, 5:00 PM

SESSION 2 [Panel]: Remaking and Remembering British Columbia

IB 1020

In this panel, three scholars actively working in the field of British Columbia history come together to consider entangled projects of history and memory making in the province. Central to this panel are concerns about engagement with historical sources, the construction of historical memory, and the role of history in the present – particularly in relation to the complex histories and the identities they inform(ed) in what is currently British Columbia. The papers by Dr Madeline Knickerbocker, Dr Chantal Norrgard, and Dr Emma Battell Lowman are united in their shared emphasis on historical research and narrative in BC, the nuances and dynamics of historical relationships between Indigenous and Settler people, religious organizations, and labour groups, and in their mutual prioritization of ethical and decolonizing scholarly practice as informed by Indigenous scholars, community members, and research.