Proposal Title

SESSION 3.1: Enforcing an Arbitrary Boundary: Hunting, Trapping, and the BC-Yukon Border

Presentation Type

Individual paper

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

2-5-2019 1:45 PM

End Date

2-5-2019 1:45 PM

Disciplines

Canadian History

Abstract

In 1925, BC’s government issued regulations requiring the registration of traplines within the province. North of the BC-Yukon Territory border, the territorial government sought temporal rather than spatial means to conserve furbearers by enforcing closed seasons on certain animals. This situation meant that two contiguous jurisdictions which shared a largely arbitrary border, were in a position where they were enforcing divergent wildlife conservation policies. Exacerbating the situation, this borderland was remote, rendering it difficult for government agents to enforce laws. Weather it was furs, meat, or trophies to adorn the walls of southern sport hunters, wildlife in the Yukon-BC borderland was important economically and for the subsistence of the local population, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. Since the implementation of regulations concerning wildlife conservation often had repercussions for individuals living beyond the boundaries of their respective jurisdictions, this paper examines the ways in which both the BC and Yukon governmental administrations affected hunting and trapping activities in neighbouring jurisdictions. The BC-Yukon border is an arbitrary boundary following the sixtieth parallel North. This boundary cut across bioregions and the cultural geographies of the Indigenous peoples who inhabited these borderlands. Similarly, White hunters found it easy to cross the border for hunting and trapping purposes, especially as aviation became increasingly common during the 1930s. While previous studies have typically been confined within Euro-Canadian political boundaries, this paper considers how these different types of boundaries influenced the extent to which wildlife conservation affected hunters and trappers in adjacent regions.

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May 2nd, 1:45 PM May 2nd, 1:45 PM

SESSION 3.1: Enforcing an Arbitrary Boundary: Hunting, Trapping, and the BC-Yukon Border

IB 1020

In 1925, BC’s government issued regulations requiring the registration of traplines within the province. North of the BC-Yukon Territory border, the territorial government sought temporal rather than spatial means to conserve furbearers by enforcing closed seasons on certain animals. This situation meant that two contiguous jurisdictions which shared a largely arbitrary border, were in a position where they were enforcing divergent wildlife conservation policies. Exacerbating the situation, this borderland was remote, rendering it difficult for government agents to enforce laws. Weather it was furs, meat, or trophies to adorn the walls of southern sport hunters, wildlife in the Yukon-BC borderland was important economically and for the subsistence of the local population, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. Since the implementation of regulations concerning wildlife conservation often had repercussions for individuals living beyond the boundaries of their respective jurisdictions, this paper examines the ways in which both the BC and Yukon governmental administrations affected hunting and trapping activities in neighbouring jurisdictions. The BC-Yukon border is an arbitrary boundary following the sixtieth parallel North. This boundary cut across bioregions and the cultural geographies of the Indigenous peoples who inhabited these borderlands. Similarly, White hunters found it easy to cross the border for hunting and trapping purposes, especially as aviation became increasingly common during the 1930s. While previous studies have typically been confined within Euro-Canadian political boundaries, this paper considers how these different types of boundaries influenced the extent to which wildlife conservation affected hunters and trappers in adjacent regions.