Proposal Title

SESSION 1.1: Is Metaphor a Mode of Knowing? BC’s “Martyr” Poet Gave an Answer

Presentation Type

Individual paper

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

2-5-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

2-5-2019 5:00 PM

Abstract

Pat Lowther, the quintessential BC Coast poet, was murdered by her husband just as her career was beginning. The problem with understanding this writer’s place in British Columbiais that her horrifying death distracts from her writing. Biography steals attention that belongs to her writing. What makes Lowther interesting—as writer not as victim—is her fascination with metaphor. She is a master of metaphor. Metaphor is the identification of one thing with another: to see one thing as another. Metaphoric thinking is little understood, despite centuries of analysis. But metaphor is inescapable for understanding reality. Thus we use metaphors to describe an electron as “particle” and as “wave”. Whatever an electron is, it is certainly not a particle—a chunk of matter—or a wave—but these visual images give us access to these unimaginable objects. Metaphors are tools for making sense of things. Lowther was a scientist of metaphor. She experimented with metaphors as means of understanding the West Coast world she loved.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 2nd, 3:30 PM May 2nd, 5:00 PM

SESSION 1.1: Is Metaphor a Mode of Knowing? BC’s “Martyr” Poet Gave an Answer

IB 1015

Pat Lowther, the quintessential BC Coast poet, was murdered by her husband just as her career was beginning. The problem with understanding this writer’s place in British Columbiais that her horrifying death distracts from her writing. Biography steals attention that belongs to her writing. What makes Lowther interesting—as writer not as victim—is her fascination with metaphor. She is a master of metaphor. Metaphor is the identification of one thing with another: to see one thing as another. Metaphoric thinking is little understood, despite centuries of analysis. But metaphor is inescapable for understanding reality. Thus we use metaphors to describe an electron as “particle” and as “wave”. Whatever an electron is, it is certainly not a particle—a chunk of matter—or a wave—but these visual images give us access to these unimaginable objects. Metaphors are tools for making sense of things. Lowther was a scientist of metaphor. She experimented with metaphors as means of understanding the West Coast world she loved.