Presentation Title

Managing Conflict Among Recreational Trail Users: A Sustainability Study of Cross Country Skiers and Fat Bikers

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented April 1, 2017

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

1-4-2017 4:15 PM

End Date

1-4-2017 4:30 PM

Abstract

This project offers applicable solutions for cross-country ski facility managers to reduce potential conflict while integrating fat bikers into their trail systems. The research offers current and useful data that is representative of the actual concerns among trail users in western Canada.

Recent technological advancements in the mountain bike industry have led to the development of fat tired bicycles, commonly referred to as the fat bike. These new oversized bikes have given bicycle enthusiasts the opportunity to ride over the snow, through the sand, and in ecologically sensitive areas by increasing the footprint and weight distribution of the rider through the tires. The ability to ride over the snow has extended the mountain bike season into the winter months, and has increased the demand for winter riding areas for fat bikers. Riders are now looking to cross-country ski facilities as destinations to undertake their recreational activity in the Province of BC.

An interdisciplinary approach that incorporates ecology, tourism and human geography, has been used to analyze current sources of user conflict between cross-country skiers and fat bikers. Applicable solutions have been offered for the integration of fat bikes into the cross-country ski areas in Western Canada. This analysis offers a new understanding and insight into an emerging issue in the tourism and recreation industries.

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Advisor

Courtney Mason

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Apr 1st, 4:15 PM Apr 1st, 4:30 PM

Managing Conflict Among Recreational Trail Users: A Sustainability Study of Cross Country Skiers and Fat Bikers

IB 1020

This project offers applicable solutions for cross-country ski facility managers to reduce potential conflict while integrating fat bikers into their trail systems. The research offers current and useful data that is representative of the actual concerns among trail users in western Canada.

Recent technological advancements in the mountain bike industry have led to the development of fat tired bicycles, commonly referred to as the fat bike. These new oversized bikes have given bicycle enthusiasts the opportunity to ride over the snow, through the sand, and in ecologically sensitive areas by increasing the footprint and weight distribution of the rider through the tires. The ability to ride over the snow has extended the mountain bike season into the winter months, and has increased the demand for winter riding areas for fat bikers. Riders are now looking to cross-country ski facilities as destinations to undertake their recreational activity in the Province of BC.

An interdisciplinary approach that incorporates ecology, tourism and human geography, has been used to analyze current sources of user conflict between cross-country skiers and fat bikers. Applicable solutions have been offered for the integration of fat bikes into the cross-country ski areas in Western Canada. This analysis offers a new understanding and insight into an emerging issue in the tourism and recreation industries.