Presentation Title

Scapular and Thoracic Placement in Kayaking

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented April 1, 2017

Location

IB 1015

Start Date

1-4-2017 2:15 PM

End Date

1-4-2017 2:30 PM

Abstract

Kayaking requires an anatomical understanding of scapular and thoracic placement in conjunction with key elements of the forward stroke, in order to reduce the frequency of injuries to these parts of the body. What can be done to help serious kayakers understand the forward stroke, given limited resources that address the topic directly? Some research on this topic has taken place, but minimally, compared to mainstream sports. With greater access to anatomical and physiological information, kayakers will have a better chance to understanding kayak motion and to use that knowledge to enhance their kayaking life. This research takes a needed interdisciplinary approach with kinesiology and adventure. Kayaking performance becomes very poor with shoulder and back dysfunction; this is like a car with flat tires. Kayakers typically have very limited understanding of kinesiology. They tend to have a strong outdoor knowledge yet a weak knowledge of their own indoors. Once hurt, or anatomically displaced, the kayaker knows he or she has a shoulder problem but may not know how to solve it. This is detrimental to their careers, expeditions, and sense of self. Kinesiology specializes in human motion but does not normally know what motions, forces, and other technical involvements are particular to kayaking. This presentation aims to bridge this barrier so that the kayaker can understand “how to keep their tires aerated," take direction, and find appropriate actions.

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Advisor

Sarah Osberg

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 1st, 2:15 PM Apr 1st, 2:30 PM

Scapular and Thoracic Placement in Kayaking

IB 1015

Kayaking requires an anatomical understanding of scapular and thoracic placement in conjunction with key elements of the forward stroke, in order to reduce the frequency of injuries to these parts of the body. What can be done to help serious kayakers understand the forward stroke, given limited resources that address the topic directly? Some research on this topic has taken place, but minimally, compared to mainstream sports. With greater access to anatomical and physiological information, kayakers will have a better chance to understanding kayak motion and to use that knowledge to enhance their kayaking life. This research takes a needed interdisciplinary approach with kinesiology and adventure. Kayaking performance becomes very poor with shoulder and back dysfunction; this is like a car with flat tires. Kayakers typically have very limited understanding of kinesiology. They tend to have a strong outdoor knowledge yet a weak knowledge of their own indoors. Once hurt, or anatomically displaced, the kayaker knows he or she has a shoulder problem but may not know how to solve it. This is detrimental to their careers, expeditions, and sense of self. Kinesiology specializes in human motion but does not normally know what motions, forces, and other technical involvements are particular to kayaking. This presentation aims to bridge this barrier so that the kayaker can understand “how to keep their tires aerated," take direction, and find appropriate actions.