Presentation Title

How do the Factors of Personality and Social Categorization Interact to Influence Unconscious Cooperative Behaviour in Humans?

Format of Presentation

15-minute lecture to be presented April 1, 2017

Location

IB 1020

Start Date

1-4-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

1-4-2017 2:15 PM

Abstract

Cooperation, working with others to achieve a common goal, is essential to human behaviour and the advancement of society. The aim of this study is to determine how individual factors (e.g., personality) interact with situational factors (e.g., one’s social categorization) to promote or inhibit cooperative behaviour among humans. Participants completed a questionnaire to determine the extent to which they express each of the Big Five personality traits. They were then assigned to complete a joint cup-passing task with either a Congruent (same social category) or Incongruent (different social category) partner. To complete the task, participants moved a mug across a table from a starting position to an intermediate position. The partner then moved the cup to the final goal position. The task required that the cup’s handle be rotated to a specific angle by the time it reached the final goal position (Dotsch & Schubo, 2015). Cooperation will be measured using frame-by-frame video analysis to determine the extent to which the participant rotates the mug’s handle by the time they place it at the intermediate position. If the participant completes a large proportion of the required rotation by the time they place it at the intermediate position, this would be interpreted as demonstrating a high degree of cooperation with their partner. It is expected that a participant’s personality will predict the extent to which they cooperate with their partner, but this will also be modulated by whether they are working with a congruent or incongruent partner. This study should provide empirical evidence that could help resolve one of the longest standing debates in the field of psychology; whether behaviour, in this case cooperative behaviour, is more strongly determined by individual traits, or by the situation. Findings from this research may be applied to facilitate more cooperative relationships among various groups of people in our homes, schools, businesses, and communities.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Jenni Karl

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Apr 1st, 2:00 PM Apr 1st, 2:15 PM

How do the Factors of Personality and Social Categorization Interact to Influence Unconscious Cooperative Behaviour in Humans?

IB 1020

Cooperation, working with others to achieve a common goal, is essential to human behaviour and the advancement of society. The aim of this study is to determine how individual factors (e.g., personality) interact with situational factors (e.g., one’s social categorization) to promote or inhibit cooperative behaviour among humans. Participants completed a questionnaire to determine the extent to which they express each of the Big Five personality traits. They were then assigned to complete a joint cup-passing task with either a Congruent (same social category) or Incongruent (different social category) partner. To complete the task, participants moved a mug across a table from a starting position to an intermediate position. The partner then moved the cup to the final goal position. The task required that the cup’s handle be rotated to a specific angle by the time it reached the final goal position (Dotsch & Schubo, 2015). Cooperation will be measured using frame-by-frame video analysis to determine the extent to which the participant rotates the mug’s handle by the time they place it at the intermediate position. If the participant completes a large proportion of the required rotation by the time they place it at the intermediate position, this would be interpreted as demonstrating a high degree of cooperation with their partner. It is expected that a participant’s personality will predict the extent to which they cooperate with their partner, but this will also be modulated by whether they are working with a congruent or incongruent partner. This study should provide empirical evidence that could help resolve one of the longest standing debates in the field of psychology; whether behaviour, in this case cooperative behaviour, is more strongly determined by individual traits, or by the situation. Findings from this research may be applied to facilitate more cooperative relationships among various groups of people in our homes, schools, businesses, and communities.