Presentation Title

Memory and Attention: Time and Integration as Boundary Conditions for Retrieval-Induced Forgetting

Format of Presentation

Poster to be presented Friday March 31, 2017

Abstract

Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is a memory phenomenon in which practicing of certain memory items inhibits recall of unpracticed but related items, as compared to unpracticed and unrelated items. Multiple studies have warned that RIF may interfere with eyewitness accuracy in the courtroom. If there is a witness to criminal events who is only asked about (and therefore practices) some of the details, RIF could lead to decreased recall of the unpracticed details if they are asked about them later. However, RIF appears to only have a negative effect on memory within certain poorly researched boundaries: the amount of time between the event, practice, and final recall, and how integrated the original information is. This study examined these boundaries and whether they interact in an effort to better inform the psychology and law communities about the actual risk of RIF within a courtroom.

Department

Psychology

Faculty Advisor

Heather Price

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Memory and Attention: Time and Integration as Boundary Conditions for Retrieval-Induced Forgetting

Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is a memory phenomenon in which practicing of certain memory items inhibits recall of unpracticed but related items, as compared to unpracticed and unrelated items. Multiple studies have warned that RIF may interfere with eyewitness accuracy in the courtroom. If there is a witness to criminal events who is only asked about (and therefore practices) some of the details, RIF could lead to decreased recall of the unpracticed details if they are asked about them later. However, RIF appears to only have a negative effect on memory within certain poorly researched boundaries: the amount of time between the event, practice, and final recall, and how integrated the original information is. This study examined these boundaries and whether they interact in an effort to better inform the psychology and law communities about the actual risk of RIF within a courtroom.